Daily Archives: July 29, 2018

Violence, Rocket Attacks, Threats Mar Mali Presidential Election

Officials in Mali are counting the votes from Sunday’s presidential election, marred by violence, rocket attacks, threats and suspected fake polling places.

President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita is seeking a second term. Twenty-four other candidates are challenging him.

Voter turnout was reported to be light across much of Mali, including the capital, Bamako. Only about half the voters in two regions received voter cards, meaning more than 800,000 people may have been unable to cast ballots.

Voting was briefly suspended in a northern village after militants fired rockets at a nearby United Nations mission camp. No one was injured.

In several other villages, election officials were beaten up, ballot boxes burned and armed groups stopped election supervisors from entering polling stations.

Some candidates and European election monitors also reported fake voting stations were set up in several spots and took steps to warn voters against them.

The international community is hoping for an overall successful presidential election in Mali. A positive outcome would help solidify a peace agreement between the government, pro-government forces and former Tuareg rebels in combating Islamic extremists in the largely lawless north.

Initial results of Sunday’s vote are expected later this week with a final result coming by Friday.

If no one wins more than 50 percent of the vote, a runoff is scheduled for August 12.

Source: Voice of America

What Zimbabweans Say About First Post-Mugabe Poll

Zimbabwe holds its first general election without its founding leader Robert Mugabe on the ballot Monday.

Mugabe took the oath of office in 1980 as Zimbabwe’s first leader after independence. He was to be the country’s head for the next 37 years � until November last year when military pressure led him to resign.

Until his sudden address to reporters Sunday Mugabe had largely been quiet, except in March when he said his successor, Emmerson Mnangagwa, had taken power through a coup. On Sunday he said he would not vote for Mnangagwa and ZANU- PF, a party he formed in the 1960s.

Jealousy Mawarire of the National Patriotic Front which is largely associated with the former first family, says the 94-year-old former leader still has a role to play.

He is a very important factor [in this election] in the sense that they are millions of people who were within ZANU-PF who respected him and believed in his pro-people stunts, says Mawarire.

While during the election campaign Mnangagwa has avoided mentioning Mugabe, his ZANU-PF party has said the main opposition leader, Nelson Chamisa of the Movement for Democratic Change Alliance, is the one closest to the former president.

In his final rally Saturday, Chamisa said he talks to Mugabe but there is no reason for the ruling ZANU-PF to disown its old man.

We understand that Mugabe was wrong in some of his actions, but he was not alone, he was with Mnangagwa. But that is not my focus, the focus is not the past, the focus is the future,” he said. “Past mistakes we correct, past omissions we remedy, past omissions we relieve but when we move forward we ask those who ruled first, where they went wrong that’s how we solve things as we are moving forward.

ZANU-PF supporters are divided about Mugabe.

When I think of Mugabe’s time we had become slaves, housing stands were taken away from us. This was painful and is still very painful to us, we feel that this is not good, says Everson Chimungungu from Epworth, just outside Harare.

I don’t want to hear about Mugabe because I’m now 48 years old and I feel that he is responsible for who I have become because I have never worked in my life, said Zvichemo Homani from Mutoko, about 200 km east of Harare.

And 73-year-old Helen Katandika from Arcturus mining-farming area just outside Harare who says she will vote for Mnangagwa.

“During the Mugabe era we were living quite well here because we have our land,” she said. “We are fairly outsiders when it comes to whether Mugabe rule was good or bad, it was amongst his colleagues in Harare who saw that he was old and needed him to retire.”

While the ZANU-PF party might try to disown Mugabe, Alexander Rusero, a senior lecturer of journalism and international politics at Harare Polytechnic College says this election is crucial for Mnangagwa.

ZANU-PF is trying to legitimize itself because by and large what happened after the ouster of Robert Mugabe you have a government that has questionable legitimacy, political legitimacy this government desperately needs,” he said. “Mnangagwa is in desperate need of endorsement to say that at least we are governing through the concern of the people, through the consent of the electorate, so this election is equally important to them should they win it because it will clear the dark episode of what happened in November.

Results of Monday’s first post-Mugabe general election are expected by Saturday.

Source: Voice of America

What Zimbabweans Say About First Post-Mugabe Poll

Zimbabwe holds its first general election without its founding leader Robert Mugabe on the ballot Monday.

Mugabe took the oath of office in 1980 as Zimbabwe’s first leader after independence. He was to be the country’s head for the next 37 years � until November last year when military pressure led him to resign.

Until his sudden address to reporters Sunday Mugabe had largely been quiet, except in March when he said his successor, Emmerson Mnangagwa, had taken power through a coup. On Sunday he said he would not vote for Mnangagwa and ZANU- PF, a party he formed in the 1960s.

Jealousy Mawarire of the National Patriotic Front which is largely associated with the former first family, says the 94-year-old former leader still has a role to play.

He is a very important factor [in this election] in the sense that they are millions of people who were within ZANU-PF who respected him and believed in his pro-people stunts, says Mawarire.

While during the election campaign Mnangagwa has avoided mentioning Mugabe, his ZANU-PF party has said the main opposition leader, Nelson Chamisa of the Movement for Democratic Change Alliance, is the one closest to the former president.

In his final rally Saturday, Chamisa said he talks to Mugabe but there is no reason for the ruling ZANU-PF to disown its old man.

We understand that Mugabe was wrong in some of his actions, but he was not alone, he was with Mnangagwa. But that is not my focus, the focus is not the past, the focus is the future,” he said. “Past mistakes we correct, past omissions we remedy, past omissions we relieve but when we move forward we ask those who ruled first, where they went wrong that’s how we solve things as we are moving forward.

ZANU-PF supporters are divided about Mugabe.

When I think of Mugabe’s time we had become slaves, housing stands were taken away from us. This was painful and is still very painful to us, we feel that this is not good, says Everson Chimungungu from Epworth, just outside Harare.

I don’t want to hear about Mugabe because I’m now 48 years old and I feel that he is responsible for who I have become because I have never worked in my life, said Zvichemo Homani from Mutoko, about 200 km east of Harare.

And 73-year-old Helen Katandika from Arcturus mining-farming area just outside Harare who says she will vote for Mnangagwa.

“During the Mugabe era we were living quite well here because we have our land,” she said. “We are fairly outsiders when it comes to whether Mugabe rule was good or bad, it was amongst his colleagues in Harare who saw that he was old and needed him to retire.”

While the ZANU-PF party might try to disown Mugabe, Alexander Rusero, a senior lecturer of journalism and international politics at Harare Polytechnic College says this election is crucial for Mnangagwa.

ZANU-PF is trying to legitimize itself because by and large what happened after the ouster of Robert Mugabe you have a government that has questionable legitimacy, political legitimacy this government desperately needs,” he said. “Mnangagwa is in desperate need of endorsement to say that at least we are governing through the concern of the people, through the consent of the electorate, so this election is equally important to them should they win it because it will clear the dark episode of what happened in November.

Results of Monday’s first post-Mugabe general election are expected by Saturday.

Source: Voice of America

JAPAN TO HOST AFRICA DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE IN AUGUST 2019

TOKYO, Japan — The Japanese government said Friday it will hold the Seventh Tokyo International Conference on African Development, (TICAD VII), in Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, south of Tokyo, on Aug 28 to 30, 2019, Japan’s Jiji Press reported.

Through both public and private efforts, we will powerfully back development led by Africa itself,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said.

Since 1993, Japan has hosted TICAD meetings jointly with the United Nations, the U.N. Development Program, the World Bank and the African Union Commission.

The last TICAD meeting in Nairobi on Aug 27 to 28, 2016, was the first to be held outside Japan.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

JAPAN TO HOST AFRICA DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE IN AUGUST 2019

TOKYO, Japan — The Japanese government said Friday it will hold the Seventh Tokyo International Conference on African Development, (TICAD VII), in Yokohama, Kanagawa Prefecture, south of Tokyo, on Aug 28 to 30, 2019, Japan’s Jiji Press reported.

Through both public and private efforts, we will powerfully back development led by Africa itself,” Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said.

Since 1993, Japan has hosted TICAD meetings jointly with the United Nations, the U.N. Development Program, the World Bank and the African Union Commission.

The last TICAD meeting in Nairobi on Aug 27 to 28, 2016, was the first to be held outside Japan.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK