Tag Archives: CommonFisheriesPolicy

Draft agenda – Monday, 15 January 2018 – Strasbourg

Draft agenda
Strasbourg Monday, 15 January 2018 – Thursday, 18 January 2018  213k
Monday, 15 January 2018   Version: Tuesday, 19 December 2017, 14:28

17:00 – 21:00   Debates
     
Speaking time
1     point Resumption of session and order of business
    point Joint debate – Clean energy
42 Deadline ***I Promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources
Report:  José Blanco López (A8-0392/2017)
Report on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council on the promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources (recast)

[COM(2016)0767 – C8-0500/2016 – 2016/0382(COD)]
Committee on Industry, Research and Energy
The vote will be held on Wednesday
40 Deadline ***I Energy efficiency
Report:  Miroslav Poche (A8-0391/2017)
Report on the proposal for a directive of the European Parliament and of the Council amending Directive 2012/27/EU on energy efficiency

[COM(2016)0761 – C8-0498/2016 – 2016/0376(COD)]
Committee on Industry, Research and Energy
The vote will be held on Wednesday
45 Deadline ***I Governance of the Energy Union
Report:  Michèle Rivasi, Claude Turmes (A8-0402/2017)
Report on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Governance of the Energy Union, amending Directive 94/22/EC, Directive 98/70/EC, Directive 2009/31/EC, Regulation (EC) No 663/2009, Regulation (EC) No 715/2009, Directive 2009/73/EC, Council Directive 2009/119/EC, Directive 2010/31/EU, Directive 2012/27/EU, Directive 2013/30/EU and Council Directive (EU) 2015/652 and repealing Regulation (EU) No 525/2013

[COM(2016)0759 – C8-0497/2016 – 2016/0375(COD)]
Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
Committee on Industry, Research and Energy

The vote will be held on Wednesday
46 Deadline ***I point Conservation of fishery resources and protection of marine ecosystems through technical measures
Report:  Gabriel Mato (A8-0381/2017)
Report on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the conservation of fishery resources and the protection of marine ecosystems through technical measures, amending Council Regulations (EC) No 1967/2006, (EC) No 1098/2007, (EC) No 1224/2009 and Regulations (EU) No 1343/2011 and (EU) No 1380/2013 of the European Parliament and of the Council, and repealing Council Regulations (EC) No 894/97, (EC) No 850/98, (EC) No 2549/2000, (EC) No 254/2002, (EC) No 812/2004 and (EC) No 2187/2005
[COM(2016)0134 – C8-0117/2016 – 2016/0074(COD)]
Committee on Fisheries
21 Deadline if requested ***I point Management, conservation and control measures applicable in the Convention Area of the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation
Report:  Linnéa Engström (A8-0377/2017)
Report on the proposal for a regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council laying down management, conservation and control measures applicable in the Convention Area of the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation (SPRFMO)
[COM(2017)0128 – C8-0121/2017 – 2017/0056(COD)]
Committee on Fisheries
31 Deadline if requested   point Implementation of EU macro-regional strategies
Report:  Andrea Cozzolino (A8-0389/2017)
Report on the implementation of EU macro-regional strategies
[2017/2040(INI)]
Committee on Regional Development
    point Short presentations of the following reports:
30 Deadline   International ocean governance: an agenda for the future of our oceans in the context of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals
Report:  José Inácio Faria (A8-0399/2017)
Report on international ocean governance: an agenda for the future of our oceans in the context of the 2030 SDGs

[2017/2055(INI)]
Committee on the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety
35 Deadline   Women, gender equality and climate justice
Report:  Linnéa Engström (A8-0403/2017)
Report on women, gender equality and climate justice

[2017/2086(INI)]
Committee on Women’s Rights and Gender Equality
2     point One-minute speeches (Rule 163)
17:00 – 21:00   Debates     item on the agenda
Commission (including replies) 35′
Rapporteurs
 
(7×6′)
42′
Rapporteurs for opinion
 
(8×1′)
8′
Rapporteurs (Rule 52(2))
 
(2×4′)
8′
“Catch the eye”
 
(6×5′)
30′
Members 18′
42 item on the agenda point Promotion of the use of energy from renewable sources
José Blanco López
(A8-0392/2017) 
    Amendments; rejection Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
40 item on the agenda point Energy efficiency
Miroslav Poche
(A8-0391/2017) 
    Amendments; rejection Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
45 item on the agenda point Governance of the Energy Union
Michèle Rivasi, Claude Turmes
(A8-0402/2017) 
    Amendments; rejection Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
46 item on the agenda point Conservation of fishery resources and protection of marine ecosystems through technical measures
Gabriel Mato
(A8-0381/2017
    Amendments; rejection Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
21 item on the agenda point Management, conservation and control measures applicable in the Convention Area of the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation
Linnéa Engström
(A8-0377/2017
    (if requested) Amendments; rejection Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
31 item on the agenda point Implementation of EU macro-regional strategies
Andrea Cozzolino
(A8-0389/2017
    (if requested) Amendments Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
30 item on the agenda point International ocean governance: an agenda for the future of our oceans in the context of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals
José Inácio Faria
(A8-0399/2017) 
    Amendments by the rapporteur, 76 MEPs at least; Alternative motions for resolutions Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
    Joint alternative motions for resolutions Monday, 15 January 2018, 19:00
35 item on the agenda point Women, gender equality and climate justice
Linnéa Engström
(A8-0403/2017) 
    Amendments by the rapporteur, 76 MEPs at least; Alternative motions for resolutions Wednesday, 10 January 2018, 13:00
    Joint alternative motions for resolutions Monday, 15 January 2018, 19:00
Separate votes – Split votes – Roll-call votes
Texts put to the vote on Tuesday Friday, 12 January 2018, 12:00
Texts put to the vote on Wednesday Monday, 15 January 2018, 19:00
Texts put to the vote on Thursday Tuesday, 16 January 2018, 19:00
Motions for resolutions concerning debates on cases of breaches of human rights, democracy and the rule of law (Rule 135) Wednesday, 17 January 2018, 19:00

Questions and Answers on the Commission's proposal for Atlantic and North Sea fish quotas (TACs) in 2018

How many fishing quotas (also referred to as Total Allowable Catches or TACs) are there in the Atlantic and North Sea?

Fishing opportunities for 78 TACs are being proposed today by the Commission for the Atlantic and North Sea:

  • 36 TACs are based on Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) advice
  • 42 TACs concern so-called data-limited stocks. This means that scientists cannot make a full assessment. Of these 42 TACs, the Commission is proposing to keep 28 at the same level of 2017 (20 are included in the agreement with the Council to keep them stable unless scientific advice shows that the stock is deteriorating. These stocks are by-catches in mixed fisheries and the TACs are rather small).

The remaining TACs are to be filled in at a later stage.

Why is it important that quotas are in line with Maximum Sustainable Yield levels?

Proposing fishing quotas or TACs at Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) levels means phasing out unsustainable fishing. Fishing at this level allows the fishing industry to take the highest possible amount of fish from the sea while keeping fish stocks healthy.

In December 2014 the EU set 36 TACs in line with MSY. In December 2016 this number was increased to 44 TACs. This is coming from a situation where 5 TACs were set in line with MSY in 2009. The Commission is again proposing to reach MSY exploitation rates by 2018 for all the stocks for which scientists have given advice. The number of Total Allowable Catches (TACs) in line with MSY will ultimately depend on the decision made by the Council in December.

What is the monetary value of the 2018 proposal compared to this year’s quotas?

As several high value or high volume TACs (e.g. some nephrops and sole TACs) are still missing from the proposal, comparing the monetary value to last year’s quotas is not possible. However, the overall value of 2017 TACs (for the Baltic, North Sea and Atlantic) was around EUR 5 billion, corresponding to EUR 1.5 billion in profits.

What’s new in the fishing opportunities for 2018?

Since 2015, fish that in the past would have been discarded has to be landed. This transition is implemented gradually, starting with fishermen in the pelagic and industrial fisheries and in fisheries of the Baltic Sea who have been asked to land all catches as of 1 January 2015. Fishermen in the North Sea and the Atlantic have been asked to land all catches of certain demersal species, since 1 January 2016.

The demersal landing obligation will be extended further in 2018, as defined in the ‘discard plans’. This applies for example to additional fisheries for whiting and saithe in the North Sea, the fisheries for saithe, black scabbardfish and roundnose grenadier in the North-Western waters and additional fisheries for anglerfish, plus fisheries for black scabbardfish, red seabream and blue whiting in the South-Western waters. To compensate the industry for the extra effort in adapting to the landing obligation, the Commission proposes the so-called “TAC top-ups” for fish stocks that fall under the landing obligation. The “top-ups” reflect the level of catches formerly discarded. This approach stems from the Basic Regulation article 16, para 2. The demersal fisheries required to land all fish in 2018 were agreed by the three regional groups of North Western Atlantic, South Western Atlantic and North Sea. These provisions are incorporated into EU law through the delegated acts on ‘discard plans’.

How will the calculation of TAC top-ups be done?

The TAC top-ups will be determined on the basis of how much the fleets that come under the landing obligation from 2017 onwards contribute to total catches and discards. When calculating the TAC top-ups this will also take into account the ‘de minimis’ percentages of discards which will still be allowed. ‘De minimis’ can be applied where it is very difficult to increase selectivity or where the costs of handling unwanted catches would be disproportionate. The ‘de minimis’ exemption is deducted from the top-up in order not to increase overall fishing mortality.

The Commission has asked the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF) to analyse all fleet segments on the basis of expected discards. Whenever discard data and information per fleet segment are incomplete, the Commission asks STECF to advise on the risks associated with using the discard average given by the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) for the whole stock to calculate TAC top-ups. This risk analysis will guide the Commission’s proposals for TAC adjustments. If on the other hand information on catches and discards by fleet segment exists, TAC adjustments can be calculated without the risk of increasing fishing mortality.

Why are “TAC top-ups” not yet included in the Commission proposal?

The Commission has asked for advice on the appropriate level of top-ups to the advisory body STECF. The advice is expected at the beginning of November. Therefore for the stocks that will be under the landing obligation in 2018 only the basic fishing opportunities, stemming from the ICES advice, are included in the Commission proposal. The Commission will table a non-paper with all the TAC top-ups as soon as possible after receiving the advice from STECF. This approach will allow discussions to start as soon as possible in preparation of the December Council.

How will the Commission avoid the ‘choking’ of certain fisheries under the landing obligation?

One of the main challenges arising from the landing obligation is the ‘choking’ phenomenon: sometimes fishing for a certain species does not make economic sense because the bycatch is high and the TAC for that bycatch is low – hence the ‘choking’ of the fishery. The Commission is consulting with stakeholders and looking for practical and sound solutions to this, solutions that must keep fishing both economically viable and sustainable. With this in mind, the TAC for dab and flounder in the North Sea was deleted this year, as it was shown to have no conservation effect. Furthermore, the tools for implementing the landing obligation should be fully explored by stakeholders, including adopting multiannual management plans to take into account the specificities of regional fisheries.

Why are there so many figures missing in the proposal?

The Commission negotiates on behalf of the EU a number of quotas for fish stocks shared with third countries (Norway, Faroe Islands, Greenland, Iceland and Russia). The same is the case for the stocks in international waters and for highly migratory species such as tuna, where the Commission negotiates fishing opportunities in regional fisheries management organisations (RFMOs). The gaps will be filled as soon as these negotiations are concluded. In addition, for some stocks advice was received too late to include figures in the proposal. 

For more information

TACs and quotas

Press Release on Commission’s proposal on fishing opportunities in the Atlantic and North Sea for 2018

More information on Quota Top-ups

Scientific advice: the proposed TACs take due account of the scientific advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF).

Stakeholders were also consulted, based on the Commission’s Consultation document

Multiannual management plans

Map of fishing areas

Commission proposes fishing opportunities in the Atlantic and North Sea for 2018

Today the Commission presents its proposal for fishing opportunities in the Atlantic and the North Sea for 2018. The Commission proposes quotas for 78 stocks: for 53 stocks the fishing quota is either increased or remains the same and for 25 stocks is reduced. The fishing opportunities, or Total Allowable Catches (TACs), are quotas set for most commercial fish stocks that keep the stocks healthy, while allowing the fishing industry to profit from fishing the highest amount of fish. As the size of some key fish stocks is increasing – notably for sole in the North Sea, northern hake and southern horse mackerel – so is the profitability of the fishing sector, with an estimated EUR 1.5 billion profit for 2017.

Karmenu Vella, Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, said: “Our fleet is becoming more profitable and that is because some of the EU’s key fish stocks are healthier and more abundant. The perseverance of the fishermen and the responsible fisheries management decisions stand to prove that sustainability and profitability can go hand in hand. That being said now is not the time for complacency. We must continue our joint efforts to manage our seas and oceans in a way that works for the environment, for the economy and for future generations.

The EU has made important progress over recent years, with 44 stocks now fished at Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) levels, up from only 5 in 2009. The objective under the Common Fisheries Policy is to have all stocks fished at sustainable levels by 2020. The process towards this goal takes into account socioeconomic and environmental factors. As the legally binding deadline for the 2020 target draws closer, the margin for setting quotas that are not sustainable is narrowing. The Commission is working with Member States to support the fishermen in this transition.

Today’s proposal will be submitted for discussion and decision by the Member States at the December Fisheries Council (11-12 December in Brussels), to be applied as from 1 January 2018.

Details of the proposal

The Commission proposes fishing quotas on the basis of independent scientific advice received from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES).

The proposal covers stocks managed by the EU alone and stocks managed in cooperation with third countries, such as Norway, or through Regional Fisheries Management Organisations (RFMOs). International negotiations for many of the stocks concerned are still ongoing and some further stocks are awaiting scientific advice. For these, the figures will be included at a later stage.

Later this autumn, the Commission will propose additional quotas, the so-called ‘quota top-ups’, for fisheries that in 2018 fall under the landing obligation, which requires that all catches of regulated commercial species on-board are landed and counted against quota. The allowed quota is thereby increased to facilitate the transition to the new system of ‘no discards’. The exact top-ups per fishery will be determined on the basis of scientific advice. The proposal does not take into account the forthcoming TAC top-ups.

  • Proposed increases: For 19 stocks, such as Norway lobster in the North Sea, 4 sole stocks and 3 plaice stocks in North Western waters, and megrims in South Western waters, the Commission proposes to increase the Total Allowable Catch. The increases also include the socioeconomically important sole stock in the Bay of Biscay that has followed a management plan led by the industry, and can now be increased. The same applies to sole in the Eastern Channel and the Western Atlantic stock of horse mackerel which can also be increased.
  • Stocks that can be fished as before: 14 stocks are kept at the same level as last year.
  • Proposed decreases: Decreases are proposed for 25 stocks. For 15 of these, the decrease proposed is less than 20%. For plaice in the Celtic sea and whiting in West of Scotland and in the Irish Sea a zero TAC is proposed.
  • A proposal to prohibit fishing of eels is introduced for all Union waters, following scientific advice emphasising the importance of ceasing all fisheries that target spawners, until there is clear evidence of improvement of the state of the stock.
  • Stocks for which scientific data are lacking: For cases where data are not sufficient to properly estimate the stock’s size, the Commission proposal follows scientific advice from ICES, i.e. cuts or increases of a maximum of 20%.

For more information

See tables below for details on today’s proposals for the Atlantic and the North Sea

TACs and quotas

Questions and Answers on Commission’s proposal on fishing opportunities in the Atlantic and North Sea for 2018

Scientific advice: the proposed TACs take due account of the scientific advice from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) and the Scientific, Technical and Economic Committee for Fisheries (STECF).

Stakeholders were also consulted, based on the Commission’s Consultation document

Multiannual management plans

Map of fishing areas

Note: The tables below only list EU stocks not shared with third countries

Table 1: Stocks with proposals for increased TAC

Common name

Scientific name

TAC Unit

final TAC in 2017, incl top-up

TAC 2018 (Proposal, excl top-up)

TAC change: 2017 – 2018 (Proposal)

Cod

Gadus morhua

7a

146

292

100%

Common sole

Solea solea

7d

2724

2933

8%

Common sole

Solea solea

8ab

3420

3621

6%

Common sole

Solea solea

7e

1178

1202

2%

Common sole

Solea solea

7fg

845

901

7%

Greater silver smelt

Argentina silus

Union waters of 3 and 4

1028

1234

20%

Greater silver smelt

Argentina silus

Union and international waters of 5, 6 and 7

3884

4661

20%

Haddock

Melanogrammus

7a

2615

2796

7%

Herring

Clupea

7a

4127

7016

70%

Horse Mackerel

Trachurus

Union waters of 2a, 4a; 6, 7a-c,7e-k, 8abde; Union and international waters of 5b; international waters of 12 and 14

83829

101070

21%

Horse Mackerel

Trachurus

8c

13271

16000

21%

Megrims

Lepidorhombus

8c, 9 and 10; Union waters of CECAF 34.1.1

1159

1387

20%

Norway lobster

Nephrops

Union waters of 2a and 4

20034

20851

4%

Plaice

Pleuronectes

7a

1098

1793

63%

Plaice

Pleuronectes

7de

10022

10360

3%

Plaice

Pleuronectes

7fg

405

511

26%

Tusk

Brosme brosme

3a, subdivision 22-32

29

31

7%

Tusk

Brosme brosme

4

235

251

7%

Tusk

Brosme brosme

Union and international waters of 5, 6 and 7

3860

4130

7%

Table 2: Stocks with no changes in TAC[1]

Common name

Scientific name

TAC Unit

final TAC in 2017, incl top-up

TAC 2018 (Proposal, excl top-up)

TAC change: 2017 – 2018 (Proposal)

Cod

Gadus morhua

Kattegat

525

525

0%

Cod

Gadus morhua

6a; Union and international waters of 5b east of 12º 00′ W

0

0

0%

Common sole

Solea solea

7a

40

40

0%

Greenland halibut

Reinhardtius hippoglossoides

Union waters of 2a and 4, international waters of 5b and 6

2500

2500

0%

Herring

Clupea harengus

Union and international waters of 5b, 6b and 6aN

4170

4170

0%

Herring

Clupea

6a (S), 7b, 7c

1630

1630

0%

Lemon sole and witch

Microstomus kitt and Glyptocephalus cynoglossus

Union waters of 2a and 4

6391

6391

0%

Ling

Molva molva

4 (EU)

3494

3494

0%

Ling

Molva molva

Union and int. waters of 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14

20396

20396

0%

Norway lobster

Nephrops

8c

0

0

0%

Picked dogfish

Squalus

Union and international waters of 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 14

270

270

0%

Pollack

Pollachius pollachius

7

12146

12141

0%

Pollack

Pollachius pollachius

8abde

1482

1482

0%

Whiting

Merlangius

8

2540

2540

0%

Table 3: Stocks with proposals for decreased TAC

Common name

Scientific name

TAC Unit

Final TAC in 2017, incl top-up

TAC 2018 (Proposal, excl top-up)

TAC change: 2017 – 2018 (Proposal)

Anchovy

Engraulis

9 and 10; Union waters of CECAF 34.1.1

12500

7115

-43%

Anglerfish

Lophius

7

33516

29534

-12%

Anglerfish

Lophius

8abde

8980

7914

-12%

Anglerfish

Lophius

8c, 9, 10, CECAF 34.1.1

3955

3879

-2%

Blue ling

Molva dypterigia

Union and int. waters of 5b, 6, 7

11314

10763

-5%

Blue ling

Molva dypterigia

Int. waters of 12

357

286

-20%

Boarfish

Caproidae

Union and international waters of 6, 7 and 8

27288

20380

-25%

Common sole

Solea solea

Union waters of 2a and 4

16123

14027

-13%

Common sole

Solea solea

3a; Union waters of Subdivisions 22-32

551

336

-39%

Haddock

Melanogrammus aeglefinus

Union and international waters of 6b, 12 and 14

4690

4202

-10%

Hake (overall N. TAC)

Merluccius

Overall northern TACs (3a / 2a and 4 / 5b, 6, 7, 12 and 14 / 8abde)

119765

97581

-19%

Hake

Merluccius

8c, 9 and 10; Union waters of CECAF 34.1.1

10520

7366

-30%

Herring

Clupea

7ghjk

14467

5445

-62%

Horse Mackerel

Trachurus

Union waters of 4b, 4c and 7d

18247

15179

-17%

Horse Mackerel

Trachurus

9

73349

55555

-24%

Megrims

Lepidorhombus

Union waters of 2a and 4

2639

2526

-4%

Megrims

Lepidorhombus

8abde

1352

1218

-10%

Megrims

Lepidorhombus

Union and international waters of 5b; 6;

5682

4691

-17%

Megrims

Lepidorhombus

7

13691

12310

-10%

Norway lobster

Nephrops

3a; Union waters of Subdivisions 22-32

12715

11738

-8%

Plaice

Pleuronectes

7hjk

128

0

-100%

Plaice

Pleuronectes platessa

Kattegat

2343

1467

-37%

Sprat

Sprattus

7de

4120

3296

-20%

Whiting

Merlangius

6; Union and international waters of 5b; international waters of 12 and 14

213

0

-100%

Whiting

Merlangius

7a

80

0

-100%

 Table 4: Stocks subject to late advice or ongoing negotiations[2]

Common name

Scientific name

TAC Unit

final TAC in 2017

Anchovy

Engraulis

8

33000

Anglerfish

Lophiidae

Union waters of 2a and 4

13521

Anglerfish

Lophius

6; Union and international waters of 5b; international waters of 12 and 14

7650

Blue ling

Molva dypterigia

Union and int. waters of 5b, 6, 7

11314

Cod

Gadus morhua

7b, 7c, 7e-k, 8, 9 and 10; Union waters of CECAF

2830

Haddock

Melanogrammus

5b,6a

3697

Haddock

Melanogrammus

7b-k, 8, 9 and 10; Union waters of CECAF 34.1.1

7751

Norway lobster

Nephrops

6; Union and international waters of 5b

16407

Norway lobster

Nephrops

7

25356

Norway lobster

Nephrops

7 – Porcupine Bank special condition

3100

Norway lobster

Nephrops

8abde

4160

Norway lobster

Nephrops

9 and 10; Union waters of CECAF 34.1.1

336

Norway pout

Trisopterus esmarki

3a, Union waters of 2a and 4

176250

Picked dogfish

Squalus

Union and international waters of 1, 5, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 14

270

Sandeel

Ammodytes

Union waters of 2a, 3a and 4

486.115

Skates and rays

Rajidae

Union waters of 2a and 4

1378

Skates and rays

Rajidae

Union waters of 3a

47

Skates and rays

Rajidae

Union waters of 6ab, 7a-c and 7e-k

8434

Skates and rays

Rajidae

Union waters of 8 and 9

3762

Skates and rays

Rajidae

7d

1063

Sprat

Sprattus sprattus

Union waters of 2a and 4

176411

Turbot and Brill

Psetta maxima & Scopthalmus rhombus

Union waters of 2a and 4

4937

Whiting

Merlangius

7b-k

27500

 

Table 5: Stocks for which the TAC is delegated to an individual member state

Common name

Scientific name

TAC Unit

Delegated to

Herring

Clupea

VI Clyde(1)

United Kingdom

Horse Mackerel

Trachurus

CECAF(Canaries)

Spain

Horse Mackerel

Trachurus

CECAF(Madeira)

Portugal

Horse Mackerel

Trachurus

X,CECAF(Azores)

Portugal

Penaeus shrimps

Penaeus

French Guyana

France

 

[1]This table [Table 2] does not include the 20 stocks included in the Joint Statement by the Council and the Commission “Ad statement stable stocks” (see Council document PECHE 491, 15502/15 REV1).

[2]Final TAC figures for 2017 are including transfers, and reflect the total TAC set by the EU for a certain stock

European Union generates global action for our ocean

Oceans cover more than 70% of the planet. They produce most of the oxygen we breathe and absorb 30% of the carbon we emit. Three billion people world-wide depend on the ocean for their livelihoods. One billion people rely on seafood as their main source of animal protein. But the oceans face a multitude of threats, such as pollution, climate change, overfishing and criminal activities at sea.

The Our Ocean conferences are a response to these mounting challenges. In preparation of this year’s conference, the EU has successfully been working with governments, private companies and non-profit organisations from a wide range of sectors to mobilise ambitious and measurable commitments to action, ranging from smaller, but high-potential, innovative approaches to industry-scale global undertakings.

Selected commitments

Marine pollution is a massive problem with over 10 million tonnes of litter annually ending up in the sea. By 2050, our oceans could contain more plastic than fish. Among the many initiatives put forward at the EU-hosted conference were:

  • MULTINATIONAL: Major consumer-goods companies such as Unilever, Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Marks & Spencer, MARS, Werner & Mertz and Carrefour all announced significant reductions in plastic use over the coming few years.
  • AUSTRIA: Vienna-based chemicals and fertilizers group, Borealis, announced a €15 million investment in mechanical recycling of polyolefins, a substance found not least in packaging.
  • UNITED KINGDOM: The Ellen MacArthur Foundation handed out the prestigious Circular Design Award to inspire innovation under its €8.5 million New Plastic Economy initiative. Sky announced €30 million over 5 years to create an Ocean Rescue Innovation Fund to develop ideas and technology to stop plastics entering the ocean.
  • EU: The European Commission announced that it will phase out by end 2017 all single-use plastic cups in water fountains and vending machines in its buildings in Brussels.

Marine protection – Less than 5% of the world’s marine and coastal areas are currently protected by law, even less is enforced. Yet, the 4th Our Ocean conference created important momentum and progress towards the UN’s 2020-target of 10% protection.

  • PACIFIC OCEAN: Chile, the Cook Islands, Indonesia, Niue and Palau committed to a number of additional marine protected areas.
  • AFRICA: With a commitment of €70 million over the next 5 years, the MAVA Foundation will advance conservation projects, notably in the Mediterranean and West Africa.
  • ATLANTIC/PACIFIC: Germany will lead an initiative with various partners, including World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), to reinforce marine protection in the South Pacific and South Atlantic
  • INDIAN OCEAN: The Oxford-led NEKTON project earmarks €30 million to boost sustainable management of the Indian Ocean.
  • ACP: The EU committed €20 million to support the management of marine protected areas in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific and proposed fishing restrictions in sensitive areas of the Adriatic Sea.
  • WORLD: The Sea Ranger initiative will establish the world’s first maritime ranger service in cooperation with business partners.

Maritime security is the basis for global trade and prosperity, but it is under threat – from natural disasters, to piracy, trafficking and armed conflict. The EU-led conference secured a significant step toward safer seas.

  • OUTER SPACE: Airbus announced plans to reinforce marine surveillance capacity by putting into orbit a new constellation of optical satellites from 2020, improving the anticipating threats.
  • UNITED STATES: Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc. will invest €34 million ‘SkyLight’ detection system, availing cutting-edge technology in the fight against illegal fishing.
  • INDIAN OCEAN: To improve maritime security and fight piracy, the EU announced inter alia €37.5 million for initiatives in East Africa and the Indian Ocean, including support for alternative livelihoods.

The blue economy is forecast to double towards 2030, from an estimated €1.3 trillion today. The theme was added by the EU to this year’s edition of the Our Ocean conference to foster stronger synergies between sustainable and circular ocean solutions and economic growth and employment, including in developing, coastal communities.

  • EU-SWEDEN: The EU with Sweden announced a €45 million Pacific-EU Marine Partnership, supporting sustainable development in the Pacific.
  • FINANCE: Althelia Ecosphere, Aviva Investors, the BPCE Group, the European Investment Bank, Seventure Partners, Willis Towers Watson and the World Bank agreed to develop a set of sustainability principles that will guide investment and financing decisions in the blue economy, with a view to announcing these principles in 2018.
  • FRANCE: The opening of the world’s first tidal turbine plant by Naval Energies in Cherbourg, France, marks the start of industrial-scale renewable ocean energy.
  • WORLD: Over the next six years, the World Bank will dedicate nearly €300 million to advance sustainable blue economy in developing countries, including Indian Ocean and Pacific regions.
  • CARIBBEAN: Royal Caribbean Cruises in the coming years will partner closely with WWF to reach ambitious and measurable sustainability targets for its global operations.

Sustainable fisheries are a prerequisite for continued access to sufficient, nutritious seafood for coming generations.

  • INSURANCE: AXA announced a code of conduct between global insurance industry leaders including Allianz AGCS and AXA prohibiting coverage to vessels involved in illegal fishing activity.
  • FRANCE: The region of Brittany has partnered with science and industry to achieve maximum sustainable yields (MSY) for fisheries by 2020.
  • PHILIPPINES: An important push towards science-based management of its main fishing grounds and an expansion of its Vessel Monitoring System to cover 35% of its registered fleet.
  • SHARKS: The Global Partnership for Sharks and Rays announced plans to award over €6 million supporting shark and ray conservation globally.
  • WEST AFRICA: The EU announced support of fisheries management in West Africa amounting to €15 million.
  • UNITED STATES: Sustainable fishery also means decent labour conditions for fishermen. A €4.2 million program will aim to combat forced labour and human trafficking on fishing vessels in the Asia-Pacific region.

Climate change has very direct consequences for the oceans, with rising sea levels and increasing acidification among the most alarming.

  • SPAIN: The world biggest fishing port, Vigo, announced 30% emission reductions by 2022, including through innovative algae capture of CO2.
  • ARCTIC: An initiative led by the Clean Arctic Alliance aims at ending the use of heavy fuel (HFO) in the fragile Arctic environment.
  • EU: WindEurope announced nearly €25 billion of investments in offshore wind energy towards 2019, whilst the European Union together with the International Maritime Organisation committed €10 million to promote energy-efficiency in maritime transport in developing countries.

The listed commitments are only examples. A full list of the commitments made during Our Ocean 2017 can be found here.

Background

Starting in 2014, high-level participants from more than 100 countries have attended the Our Ocean conferences (hosted by the Governments of the United States in 2014 and 2016 and Chile in 2015 and by the European Union in Malta this year), including Heads of State or Government and ministers, companies ranging from large industry and the traditional fisheries sector to Silicon Valley tech, NGOs and philanthropic organisations. They have made over 700 concrete, measurable and tracked commitments. Next year’s conference will be hosted by Indonesia, followed by Norway in 2019.

More information

Our Ocean 2017 website and livestream

Our Ocean 2017 commitments

Our Ocean 2017 media centre (i.e. infographics on all Our Ocean themes).

Factsheet: EU leads the way with ambitious action for cleaner and safer seas

European Union generates global action for our ocean

Oceans cover more than 70% of the planet. They produce most of the oxygen we breathe and absorb 30% of the carbon we emit. Three billion people world-wide depend on the ocean for their livelihoods. One billion people rely on seafood as their main source of animal protein. But the oceans face a multitude of threats, such as pollution, climate change, overfishing and criminal activities at sea.

The Our Ocean conferences are a response to these mounting challenges. In preparation of this year’s conference, the EU has successfully been working with governments, private companies and non-profit organisations from a wide range of sectors to mobilise ambitious and measurable commitments to action, ranging from smaller, but high-potential, innovative approaches to industry-scale global undertakings.

Selected commitments

Marine pollution is a massive problem with over 10 million tonnes of litter annually ending up in the sea. By 2050, our oceans could contain more plastic than fish. Among the many initiatives put forward at the EU-hosted conference were:

  • MULTINATIONAL: Major consumer-goods companies such as Unilever, Procter & Gamble, PepsiCo, Marks & Spencer, MARS, Werner & Mertz and Carrefour all announced significant reductions in plastic use over the coming few years.
  • AUSTRIA: Vienna-based chemicals and fertilizers group, Borealis, announced a €15 million investment in mechanical recycling of polyolefins, a substance found not least in packaging.
  • UNITED KINGDOM: The Ellen MacArthur Foundation handed out the prestigious Circular Design Award to inspire innovation under its €8.5 million New Plastic Economy initiative. Sky announced €30 million over 5 years to create an Ocean Rescue Innovation Fund to develop ideas and technology to stop plastics entering the ocean.
  • EU: The European Commission announced that it will phase out by end 2017 all single-use plastic cups in water fountains and vending machines in its buildings in Brussels.

Marine protection – Less than 5% of the world’s marine and coastal areas are currently protected by law, even less is enforced. Yet, the 4th Our Ocean conference created important momentum and progress towards the UN’s 2020-target of 10% protection.

  • PACIFIC OCEAN: Chile, the Cook Islands, Indonesia, Niue and Palau committed to a number of additional marine protected areas.
  • AFRICA: With a commitment of €70 million over the next 5 years, the MAVA Foundation will advance conservation projects, notably in the Mediterranean and West Africa.
  • ATLANTIC/PACIFIC: Germany will lead an initiative with various partners, including World Wildlife Foundation (WWF), to reinforce marine protection in the South Pacific and South Atlantic
  • INDIAN OCEAN: The Oxford-led NEKTON project earmarks €30 million to boost sustainable management of the Indian Ocean.
  • ACP: The EU committed €20 million to support the management of marine protected areas in Africa, the Caribbean and the Pacific and proposed fishing restrictions in sensitive areas of the Adriatic Sea.
  • WORLD: The Sea Ranger initiative will establish the world’s first maritime ranger service in cooperation with business partners.

Maritime security is the basis for global trade and prosperity, but it is under threat – from natural disasters, to piracy, trafficking and armed conflict. The EU-led conference secured a significant step toward safer seas.

  • OUTER SPACE: Airbus announced plans to reinforce marine surveillance capacity by putting into orbit a new constellation of optical satellites from 2020, improving the anticipating threats.
  • UNITED STATES: Microsoft co-founder Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Inc. will invest €34 million ‘SkyLight’ detection system, availing cutting-edge technology in the fight against illegal fishing.
  • INDIAN OCEAN: To improve maritime security and fight piracy, the EU announced inter alia €37.5 million for initiatives in East Africa and the Indian Ocean, including support for alternative livelihoods.

The blue economy is forecast to double towards 2030, from an estimated €1.3 trillion today. The theme was added by the EU to this year’s edition of the Our Ocean conference to foster stronger synergies between sustainable and circular ocean solutions and economic growth and employment, including in developing, coastal communities.

  • EU-SWEDEN: The EU with Sweden announced a €45 million Pacific-EU Marine Partnership, supporting sustainable development in the Pacific.
  • FINANCE: Althelia Ecosphere, Aviva Investors, the BPCE Group, the European Investment Bank, Seventure Partners, Willis Towers Watson and the World Bank agreed to develop a set of sustainability principles that will guide investment and financing decisions in the blue economy, with a view to announcing these principles in 2018.
  • FRANCE: The opening of the world’s first tidal turbine plant by Naval Energies in Cherbourg, France, marks the start of industrial-scale renewable ocean energy.
  • WORLD: Over the next six years, the World Bank will dedicate nearly €300 million to advance sustainable blue economy in developing countries, including Indian Ocean and Pacific regions.
  • CARIBBEAN: Royal Caribbean Cruises in the coming years will partner closely with WWF to reach ambitious and measurable sustainability targets for its global operations.

Sustainable fisheries are a prerequisite for continued access to sufficient, nutritious seafood for coming generations.

  • INSURANCE: AXA announced a code of conduct between global insurance industry leaders including Allianz AGCS and AXA prohibiting coverage to vessels involved in illegal fishing activity.
  • FRANCE: The region of Brittany has partnered with science and industry to achieve maximum sustainable yields (MSY) for fisheries by 2020.
  • PHILIPPINES: An important push towards science-based management of its main fishing grounds and an expansion of its Vessel Monitoring System to cover 35% of its registered fleet.
  • SHARKS: The Global Partnership for Sharks and Rays announced plans to award over €6 million supporting shark and ray conservation globally.
  • WEST AFRICA: The EU announced support of fisheries management in West Africa amounting to €15 million.
  • UNITED STATES: Sustainable fishery also means decent labour conditions for fishermen. A €4.2 million program will aim to combat forced labour and human trafficking on fishing vessels in the Asia-Pacific region.

Climate change has very direct consequences for the oceans, with rising sea levels and increasing acidification among the most alarming.

  • SPAIN: The world biggest fishing port, Vigo, announced 30% emission reductions by 2022, including through innovative algae capture of CO2.
  • ARCTIC: An initiative led by the Clean Arctic Alliance aims at ending the use of heavy fuel (HFO) in the fragile Arctic environment.
  • EU: WindEurope announced nearly €25 billion of investments in offshore wind energy towards 2019, whilst the European Union together with the International Maritime Organisation committed €10 million to promote energy-efficiency in maritime transport in developing countries.

The listed commitments are only examples. A full list of the commitments made during Our Ocean 2017 can be found here.

Background

Starting in 2014, high-level participants from more than 100 countries have attended the Our Ocean conferences (hosted by the Governments of the United States in 2014 and 2016 and Chile in 2015 and by the European Union in Malta this year), including Heads of State or Government and ministers, companies ranging from large industry and the traditional fisheries sector to Silicon Valley tech, NGOs and philanthropic organisations. They have made over 700 concrete, measurable and tracked commitments. Next year’s conference will be hosted by Indonesia, followed by Norway in 2019.

More information

Our Ocean 2017 website and livestream

Our Ocean 2017 commitments

Our Ocean 2017 media centre (i.e. infographics on all Our Ocean themes).

Factsheet: EU leads the way with ambitious action for cleaner and safer seas