DHS’ empty positions; agriculture security at risk; positive train control, and more

Our picksDHS’ empty positions; agriculture security at risk; positive train control, and more

Published 20 December 2017

· All the key Department of Homeland Security positions Trump has left unfilled

· The National Security Strategy papers over a crisis

· Is agriculture security at risk? More than you realize

· Reciprocal rage: why Islamist extremists and the far right need each other

· The Internet of Things is going to change everything about cybersecurity

· Cybersecurity in the Trump era

· What Trump’s National Security Strategy says on cyber

· Could positive train control have prevented the Washington wreck?

All the key Department of Homeland Security positions Trump has left unfilled (Heather Timmons, NextGov)
The Department of Homeland Security is tasked with keeping the US safe, from securing the country’s borders to protecting against attacks on its electrical grids and thwarting terrorism attacks. One of its biggest challenges in recent months has come from the White House itself: Since Donald Trump took office in January, dozens of top jobs have been left unassigned, hollowing out the massive agency.

The National Security Strategy papers over a crisis (Thomas Wright, Defense One)
The NSS is a stunning repudiation of Trump, and Trump’s speech was a stunning repudiation of the NSS.

Is agriculture security at risk? More than you realize (Sara Brown, Drovers)
When U.S. Navy Seals entered the hiding place for Osama Bin Laden they found a list of 16 deadly agricultural pathogens that Al Qaeda intended to use as bioweapons, said former Sen. Joe Lieberman during a recent Senate Committee on Agriculture hearing on agro-defense. Six of the bioweapons targeted livestock production. Four targeted crop production. Six more targeted humans.

Reciprocal rage: why Islamist extremists and the far right need each other (Sean Illing, Vox)
How two complementary extremisms are defining global politics.

The Internet of Things is going to change everything about cybersecurity (Yevgeny Dibrov, Harvard Business Review)
Cybersecurity can cause organizational migraines. In 2016, breaches cost businesses nearly $4 billion and exposed an average of 24,000 records per incident. In 2017, the number of breaches is anticipated to rise by 36%. The constant drumbeat of threats and attacks is becoming so mainstream that businesses are expected to invest more than $93 billion in cyber defenses by 2018. Even Congress is acting more quickly to pass laws that will — hopefully — improve the situation.

Cybersecurity in the Trump era (Wall Street Journal)
It isn’t much different than under President Obama, say Gregory Touhill and Christopher Krebs. That says a lot about the issue.

What Trump’s National Security Strategy says on cyber (Mark Pomerleau, Fifth Domain)
Here’s what the Trump administration’s National Security Strategy means for the nation’s cybersecurity strategy.

Could positive train control have prevented the Washington wreck? (David A. Graham, The Atlantic)
The NTSB said the train that derailed south of Seattle on Monday was traveling 80 miles per hour, 50 miles faster than the speed limit on the curve where it crashed.