Daily Archives: March 15, 2019

High Powerful Cryptocurrency Miners Released

LUXEMBOURG / ACCESSWIRE / March 15, 2019 / OnMiners S.A (www.OnMiners.com) is pleased to announce the official launch of their powerful endothermic cryptocurrency mining rigs with features to take the global crypto mining space by storm. The company informs that their just launched multi-algorithm miners offer the biggest hash rates available in the market, while minimizing power consumption, noise, and heat generation.

OnMiners currently offers three mining rigs viz. On2U, On4U, and OnTower, all capable of mining Bitcoin, Litecoin, Ethereum, Monero, Dash, and Zcash. All these units come pre-configured, allowing users to start mining immediately just by plugging in.

Hash rate is the most important factor to take into account while choosing a crypto mining rig. In simple words, it can be defined as the speed at which a given mining machine operates. A higher hash rate is always preferred by the miners because it increases their opportunity of finding the next block and receiving the reward. Mentioned below are the hash powers of the three products at a glance.

Hash Power

On2U: 140 TH/s for Bitcoin, 38 GH/s for Litecoin, 5 GH/s for Ethereum, 230 KH/s for Monero, 1.3 TH/s for Dash, and 1.1 MH/s

On4U: 270 TH/s for Bitcoin, 75 GH/s for Litecoin, 9 GH/s for Ethereum, 450 KH/s for Monero, 2.5 TH/s for Dash, and 2.1 MH/s

OnTower: 1620 TH/s for Bitcoin, 450 GH/s for Litecoin, 54 GH/s for Ethereum, 2700 KH/s for Monero, 15 TH/s for Dash, and 12.6 MH/s

The importance of hash power was taken into consideration by OnMiners while designing their three miners. The result is the creation of three products with hash rates that are second to none in the market.

Power Consumption

Another key attribute of the three miners from OnMiners is their endothermic nature. Making use of the latest endothermic chip technology, OnMiners ensures that their products are capable of absorbing heat energy from the surroundings rather than releasing the same. As a result, these miners have a significantly lower energy consumption compared to all available alternatives in the market. The power consumption of the On2U and On4U units are 600W±7% and 1200W±7% respectively. Being a combination of six On4U Units, the power consumption of OnTower is six times that of the On4U miners.

Other Key Features:

*Comes pre-configured, so the customer only needs to plug in and start mining 
*Original OnMiners air cooling noiseless system 
*Network Connection: Ethernet and Wi-Fi 
*One year warranty 
*Use of 7 nm endometric chip 
*Noise level of 18db and 20 db for On2U and On4U units 
*Compatible with universal sockets 110v-240v 
*Delivered all over the world except for the countries in the war zone

”The global market has seen lots of mining farms closing down their operations in the recent months. With the release of our new products, investors now have a great opportunity to get back on business with higher profitability than ever before,” said Hisao Saito, the CEO of OnMiners.

At the current difficulty level and price, their three miners from OnMiners were designed to deliver 100% return on investment within approximately a month. The launch of these miners certainly creates a win-win situation for the crypto mining investors because they will now be able to run a mining rig or even an entire mining farm without the need of hiring qualified personnel.

To find out more about OnMiners and their products, please visit https://www.onminers.com/

About

OnMiners is a company founded by a group of investors that have invested in the new generation of Endothermic Multi Algorithm CHIP. Their goal is to deliver cryptocurrency miners that are powerful, but have lower power consumption. Utilizing the endothermic chip technology, OnMiners offers a comprehensive range of mining rigs that are easier to set up, release less heat compared to others, and save energy bills for the users.

Contact:

Lucie Weber
lucie@onminers.com
+352 27 86 12 84

SOURCE: OnMiners S.A

Landmark international guideline launched on Human Rights and Drug Policy

Vienna – A coalition of UN Member States, UN entities and leading human rights experts meeting at the Commission on Narcotic Drugs launched today, a landmark set of international legal standards to transform and reshape global responses to the world drug problem.

The International Guidelines on Human Rights and Drug Policy introduces a comprehensive catalogue of human rights standards. Grounded in decades of evidence, they are a guide for governments to develop human rights compliant drug policies, covering the spectrum of cultivation to consumption. Harnessing the universal nature of human rights, the document covers a range of policy areas from development to criminal justice to public health.

The guidelines come at an important moment when high-level government representatives are convening at the Commission on Narcotic Drugs to shape a new global strategy on drugs. Under the mounting weight of evidence that shows the systemic failures of the dominant punitive paradigm, including widespread human rights violations, governments are facing growing calls to shift course.

Drug control policies intersect with much of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Developmentand the pledge by Member States to leave no one behind. Approaches that violate human rights and fail to curb the illicit drug trade are leaving a trail of human suffering, said Mandeep Dhaliwal, Director of UNDP’s HIV, Health and Development Group. For countries who are ready to place human dignity and sustainable development at the heart of their drug control policy, these guidelines offer valuable guidance to promote more effective and humane drug control policy.

Seeking to promote the rule of law, the guidelines feature recommendations across the administration of justicefrom discriminatory policing practices, to arbitrary arrest and detention, to decriminalisation of drugs for personal usethe guidelines articulate the global state of human rights law in relation to drug policy, which includes ending the death penalty for drug-related offenses.

At least 25 national governments from Argentina to South Africa have scrapped criminal penalties for possession of drugs for personal, non-medical use, either in law or practice, setting an example for others to follow. The United Nations system has jointly called for decriminalization as an alternative to conviction and punishment in appropriate cases.

Punishment and exclusion have been instrumental to the war on drugs said Judy Chang, Executive Director of the International Network of People who Use Drugs. The time has come to privilege human dignity over social isolation and champion human rights, putting an end to the shameful legacy of mass incarceration.

Beyond moving away from a punitive approach to drugs, the Guidelines make clear that a human rights approach is critical in improving peoples’ enjoyment of the right to health, to live free from torture, and to an adequate standard of living. In accordance with their right to health obligations States should ensure the availability and accessibility of harm reduction services which should be adequately funded, appropriate for the needs of vulnerable groups and be respectful of human dignity.

99% of people who inject drugs do not have adequate access to harm reduction services and are left behind in progress against HIV, said Michel Sidibe, Executive Director of UNAIDS. More than 12% of people who inject drugs are living with HIV and over half have hepatitis C. The only way to advance progress is to put people at the centre, not drugs.

The Guidelines highlight the importance of protecting the rights of farming communities especially women to arable land. Consistent with international standards, they suggest governments temporarily permit the cultivation of illicit drug crops when necessary to allow for smooth transitions to more sustainable livelihoods. Thailands success in supporting opium famers to transition to alternative livelihoods is one such example.

Human rights should not just inform critiques of the response to drugs worldwide, they should also be the main drivers of its reform, underpinning checks and balances to break cycles of abuse said Julie Hannah, Director of the International Centre on Human Rights and Drug Policy, University of Essex Fighting inequality and injustice is a more effective way of addressing the global drug problem than prisons and police.

The Guidelines will support member states, multilateral organisations and civil society to integrate the UN Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights into national and global policymaking.

For media enquiries please contact:

UNDP | Sangita Khadka | tel. +1 212 906 5043 | Sangita.khadka@undp.org

UNAIDS | Sophie Barton-Knott | tel. +41 22 791 4237 | bartonknotts@unaids.org

UNDP

UNDP partners with people at all levels of society to help build nations that can withstand crisis, and drive and sustain the kind of growth that improves the quality of life for everyone. On the ground in nearly 170 countries and territories, we offer global perspective and local insight to help empower lives and build resilient nations. www.undp.org.

UNAIDS

The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) leads and inspires the world to achieve its shared vision of zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS-related deaths. UNAIDS unites the efforts of 11 UN organizationsUNHCR, UNICEF, WFP, UNDP, UNFPA, UNODC, UN Women, ILO, UNESCO, WHO and the World Bankand works closely with global and national partners towards ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030 as part of the Sustainable Development Goals. http://www.unaids.org

Source: United Nations Development Programme

Labour hosts National Service Delivery campaign in Free State, 18 to 29 Mar

The Director General’s service delivery campaign hits Qwaqwa

In a quest to address service delivery challenges government is faced with, the Director General of the Department of Labour, Thobile Lamati, will be hosting a national service delivery campaign in the Free State province. This campaign has been coined, Taking Department of Labour Services to the People and will see scores of Departmental officials descending to QwaQwa in the Eastern Free State to provide instance and optimum services to the people.

In accordance with the mantra embodied on the name of the campaign, quality services will be provided right at the door-step of the stakeholders and clients of the Department. Amongst others, the Director General (DG) initiated this campaign in light of the socio-economic maligns regressing noble intensions to create jobs, the high rate of joblessness our country continues to grapple with, as well as other service delivery bottlenecks the Department is faced with.

To that effect, the following branches and entities of the Department will offer their respective services to their individual clientele; Inspection and Enforcement Services, Unemployment Insurance Fund, Compensation Fund, Public Employment Services, Sheltered Employment Enterprises and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration.

To ensure the full basket of government services is offered, the following government departments and state entities will also be providing their services;

Department of Home Affairs, Department of Rural Development, Department of Education, Department of the Premier, Department of Communication, the South African Post Office, Rand Mutual Assurance, SAPS, ABSA Bank, Teba Bank, Maluti TVET College, MERSETA, LGSETA, Stats SA, GCIS, NYDA, FDC, and the South African Association of Youth Clubs.

The main service delivery event will be held on the 30th of March 2019 which will also see the DG having lunch with Labour Federations. The DG’s breakfast session with employers will be held on the eve of the main event to, amongst others, lure employers to use the database of the Department whenever they have job opportunities.

Presentations by Departmental entities such as Productivity South Africa on their service offerings and how they assist companies in distress and those facing possible closures to improve their production levels and thereby save jobs, will also be made. Deliberations will also ensue between all invited stakeholders on how the department can improve its services and better serve its stakeholders and clients.

The same breakfast session will be preceded by the build-up programme which will start from the 18th to the 29th of March 2019. This build-up programme will see officials out and about in different villages in QwaQwa to provide effective and quality services right at the door-step of our clientele. The idea is to reach those communities in the outskirts, those on the periphery of our cities and towns who ordinarily have to travel long distances to access Departmental services.

Source: Government of South Africa

Western Cape Economic Development and Tourism on World Consumer Rights Day

Message on World Consumer Rights Day

Today marks World Consumer Rights Day which is an important global event aimed at promoting the basic rights of all consumers and highlighting market abuses and social injustices.

Consumers International has declared theme for this year as Trusted Smart Products. In the Western Cape, the focus is on Section 56 of the Consumer Protection Act which deals with the right to return goods.

Minister of Economic Opportunities, Beverley SchA�fer said: “Consumer rights are at the heart of sound economic practices and we encourage all of our citizens to know and understand their rights and commend those businesses that respect and honour the rights set out in the Consumer Protection Act.”

The provincial office of the Consumer Protector (OCP) will celebrate World Consumer Rights by conducting awareness activities and workshops across the province throughout the month of March.

These information sessions and workshops will focus on providing basic information to consumers, business and other interested parties on Section 56 of the CPA.

Some of the important consumer protection topics will include:

The 9 consumer rights as contained in the Consumer Protection Act

Misleading advertising

The legally prescribed six-month statutory warranty in terms of the CPA

For consumers who are unsure of their rights with regards to Section 56, below are some frequently asked questions:

When can a consumer return goods to the supplier?

A consumer may return goods to the supplier within six months after the day of purchase if the goods have a material defect.

What does material defect mean

Any material imperfection in the manufacture of the goods or components, or in performance of the services, that renders the goods or results of the service less acceptable than persons generally would be reasonably entitled to expect in the circumstances.

What are the rights of the consumer regarding returns and refunds?

All goods purchased by a consumer are subject to an implied warranty of quality and suppliers cannot contract out of this provision. This means that a consumer has the right to receive goods which are:

Of good quality and are reasonably suited for the purpose for which they are intended, failing which the consumer has the right to return the goods and ask for either a replacement, repair or refund.

Source: Government of South Africa

Western Cape Economic Development and Tourism on World Consumer Rights Day

Message on World Consumer Rights Day

Today marks World Consumer Rights Day which is an important global event aimed at promoting the basic rights of all consumers and highlighting market abuses and social injustices.

Consumers International has declared theme for this year as Trusted Smart Products. In the Western Cape, the focus is on Section 56 of the Consumer Protection Act which deals with the right to return goods.

Minister of Economic Opportunities, Beverley SchA�fer said: “Consumer rights are at the heart of sound economic practices and we encourage all of our citizens to know and understand their rights and commend those businesses that respect and honour the rights set out in the Consumer Protection Act.”

The provincial office of the Consumer Protector (OCP) will celebrate World Consumer Rights by conducting awareness activities and workshops across the province throughout the month of March.

These information sessions and workshops will focus on providing basic information to consumers, business and other interested parties on Section 56 of the CPA.

Some of the important consumer protection topics will include:

The 9 consumer rights as contained in the Consumer Protection Act

Misleading advertising

The legally prescribed six-month statutory warranty in terms of the CPA

For consumers who are unsure of their rights with regards to Section 56, below are some frequently asked questions:

When can a consumer return goods to the supplier?

A consumer may return goods to the supplier within six months after the day of purchase if the goods have a material defect.

What does material defect mean

Any material imperfection in the manufacture of the goods or components, or in performance of the services, that renders the goods or results of the service less acceptable than persons generally would be reasonably entitled to expect in the circumstances.

What are the rights of the consumer regarding returns and refunds?

All goods purchased by a consumer are subject to an implied warranty of quality and suppliers cannot contract out of this provision. This means that a consumer has the right to receive goods which are:

Of good quality and are reasonably suited for the purpose for which they are intended, failing which the consumer has the right to return the goods and ask for either a replacement, repair or refund.

Source: Government of South Africa