Daily Archives: October 25, 2018

Ethiopian MPs Elect First Female President

Veteran Ethiopian diplomat Sahle-Work Zewde has been elected by lawmakers as the east African nation’s first female president.

She will succeed MulatuTeshome, who resigned from the largely ceremonial post on Wednesday. She is limited to two six-year terms in office.

The 68-year-old Sahle-Work is the United Nations’ Special Representative to the African Union. She has previously served Ethiopia as ambassador to France, Senegal and Djibouti, and headed the U.N. office in Nairobi.

FitsumArega, the chief of staff for Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, hailed Sahle-Work’s election Thursday on Twitter. “In a patriarchal society such as ours, the appointment of a female head of state not only sets the standard for the future but also normalises women as decision-makers in public life,” he wrote.

Ethiopia has undergone a rapid political and cultural transformation since reformist Prime Minister Abiy took office in April. Ten out of 20 members of his new cabinet he appointed last week are women, including the country’s first female defense minister.

Source: Voice of America

RAJA CASABLANCA ADVANCE TO AFRICAN FOOTBALL CONFEDERATION CUP FINAL

RABAT, Morocco – Moroccan giants, Raja Casablanca, qualified for the African Confederation Cup final, after defeating Nigerians Enyimba 3-1 on aggregate, on Wednesday.

Having secured a precious 1-0 away victory, the three-time African champions League winners, Raja, entered the game with great confidence in front of a packed Mohammed V stadium, in Casablanca.

Striker ZakariaHadraf made the task of his team easier, scoring a goal at the very end of the first half.

In the second half, the Nigerians pressed to come back, but it was their defender, OladuntoyeIsiaka, who scored against his own goal, to give the Moroccans a comfortable advance in the 88th minute.

But after one minute, Enyimba scored their first goal, in the two confrontations with Raja, through Abdulrahaman Bashir.

This is the first final for Raja Casablanca since 2005, in the CAF Champions League.

Their last African trophy dates back to 2005, when they beat Coton Sport of Cameroon 2-0, on aggregate, in the last final of the now defunct CAF Cup.

In the final, Raja will face the Congolese side of Vita Club, who hammered Al Masry of Egypt 4-0 on aggregate.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

President Cyril Ramaphosa: Inauguration of the Dunnottar Train Factory

Address By President Cyril Ramaphosa at the Inauguration of the Dunnottar Train Factory, Dunnottar, Ekurhuleni

Programme Director,

Minister of Transport, Dr Blade Nzimande,

Mayor of Ekurhuleni, MrMzwandileMasina,

Chairperson of PRASA board, MsKhanyisileKweyama,

Distinguished Guests,

Ladies and gentlemen,

It is a great honour to officially inaugurate this train manufacturing factory.

This is a great moment both for the development of passenger rail in South Africa and for the expansion of the industrial capacity of our economy.

As an essential part of government’s rolling stock fleet renewal programme, this factory serves as a catalyst for the transformation of passenger rail services and public transport more broadly.

It demonstrates our determination to develop passenger rail as a critical enabler of economic growth and social development.

Passenger rail is among the most cost-effective and efficient means to connect people to places of work, to connect them to vacation destinations, to connect them to relatives and to friends.

Even as we work to overcome the spatial distortions of the apartheid urban landscape, we will rely on passenger rail to carry millions of South Africans to and from work.

Our railways must become the arteries of a growing economy that brings meaningful improvement in people’s lives.

It is therefore essential that we ensure that our passenger rail service is safe, affordable and efficient.

We want our train service not only to improve people’s economic prospects, but also to improve their quality of life.

Our trains must deliver people to work on time and ensure that they are able to return home to their families without delay or anxiety.

The train sets that are being manufactured here will significantly improve the reliability and the comfort of the service.

For decades, passenger rail served as an adjunct of the apartheid system of dormitory townships, keeping black people at a distance from white cities while securing access to their labour.

We need to redefine our passenger rail services as an essential part of integrated cities, where people are able to live in cohesive communities close to work opportunities and amenities; cities where people are able to move around with ease, welcome and comfortable in all parts of the urban space.

We look to our passenger rail services also to redefine the relationship between urban and rural areas, to assist in the conversion of rural towns from destitute backwaters into vibrant and sustainable economic centres.

We do not view passenger rail in isolation from our broader public transport infrastructure.

All forms of public transport need to be more effectively integrated, providing commuters with a seamless, efficient and affordable service from door to door.

Such an integrated system is necessary if we are to reduce congestion in our urban centres, if we are to reduce the cost of road building and maintenance and if we are to make progress in reducing our carbon footprint.

After decades of under-investment in new trains for passenger rail transport, this investment signifies a new era in the modernisation of the commuter rail network.

This factory will have a profound impact not only in the sphere of public transport, but also in developing the country’s manufacturing capacity.

For instead of simply importing new train sets, we have used this opportunity to invest in local industry, capabilities and skills.

It gives concrete expression to our determination as articulated in the framework agreement adopted at the Jobs Summit earlier this month to buy South African goods.

This factory is not only about building trains; it is also about advancing the industrialisation of our economy.

As part of our drive to achieve sustainable economic growth and significantly expand employment, we have identified the growth of our manufacturing base as a key priority.

After years of decline, we are determined to restore manufacturing as a growing sector of our economy, in large part because it has great potential to create jobs, support secondary industries and increase our export capacity.

This factory will demonstrate that South Africa has advanced manufacturing capabilities that will only gain in value over time.

The market for rail rolling stock in the region and elsewhere on the African continent is likely to continue to expand for several decades to come as the working population grows and infrastructure investment gathers ever greater pace.

Most importantly, this factory is helping to address the most important challenge in South Africa today unemployment, especially among the youth.

We are told that the rolling stock fleet renewal programme is expected to create over 8,000 direct jobs throughout the Gibela Consortium’s supply chain, with this factory targeting the creation of 1,500 jobs.

These are new jobs in an industry that is relatively new in our country, and which has great potential for expansion.

Nearly all of the jobs in this factory will be filled by South Africans, with the aim to employ 85% historically disadvantaged persons and at least 25% women.

It is our hope, and expectation, that with time, the factory will increase the proportion of women within its workforce to at least 50%.

This is the kind of decent work that the social partners spoke about when they convened at the Jobs Summit; work which draws in young people without much experience or prior training and provides them with skills that will serve them well beyond the life of this project.

Another significant and valuable part of this project is the emphasis on localisation.

The aim to achieve a minimum of 65% local content on the new trains creates opportunities for the emergence of a range of supplier businesses.

We are particularly excited by plans to build a supplier park adjacent to the factory, which will be a critical enabler to support localisation and develop a rail industrial hub.

We further applaud the strong focus on skilling artisans and engineers as part of the train manufacturing process.

We note that by the end of this programme, the Gibela Consortium aims to have trained over 6,700 artisans, about 2,000 engineering technicians and nearly 600 professional engineers.

This will be in addition to the modern and efficient trains the greatest legacy of this project.

These artisans, engineering technicians and professional engineers will remain as part of the country’s growing resource pool.

They will remain as a national asset that will continue to support economic development for decades to come.

We welcome the establishment of training centres and the provision of bursaries across the different disciplines to students from poor and marginalised communities across South Africa.

This project demonstrates the value of partnership between the government, its agencies and the private sector, ensuring that public investment in infrastructure is effectively leveraged to promote industrialisation, localisation and job creation.

As we establish a new Infrastructure Fund to consolidate government’s infrastructure spending, and as we establish mechanisms to ensure more effective implementation, we will look to this project as a successful model for public and private cooperation.

Over the next few days, investors from around South Africa and across the world will gather in Johannesburg for the inaugural South Africa Investment Conference.

There can be no greater demonstration of the potential of our economy to a would-be investor than the factory we are opening today.

Distinguished Guests,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

The inauguration of this factory forms an appropriate backdrop to our broader effort to fix our commuter rail system.

As part of this effort, we have taken decisive measures to stabilisePrasa as a critical enabler of effective public transport and economic activity.

We commend the board and management of Prasa, the Department of Transport and all stakeholders for the work they have been doing, under difficult conditions, to restore the financial and operational health of the agency.

We remain deeply concerned about the issue of passenger safety and are committed as government to take whatever steps necessary to ensure that every commuter can travel on our trains without fear.

All stakeholders need to work together with greater focus and coordination to bring an end to the destruction of carriages by criminal elements bent on the sabotage of our economy, our state and lives of our people.

We must find the perpetrators, we must stop them and we must prosecute them.

This is part of our shared responsibility to the commuters of this country.

Working together, we must ensure that their journeys are safe, comfortable and affordable, that the trains arrive when they are expected and that they do so consistently and reliably.

This factory is building not only the trains of the future; it is also creating the jobs of the future, the economy of the future and the South Africa of the future.

This is a great achievement and we wish it every success.

I thank you.

Source: Government of South Africa

Deputy President Mabuza to take a few days leave

Deputy President David Mabuza will from today, 25 October 2018, take a few days sick leave. This will take him off from public engagements.

The Deputy President has requested the President to grant him leave for a few days to rest and he will be back at work to continue with his programme soon enough, said ThamiNgwenya, Spokesperson to the Deputy President.

Source: The Presidency Republic of South Africa

Amid Growing Humanitarian Toll From Spread of Conventional Weapons, Delegates in First Committee Share Strategies for Combating Illegal Arms Sales

Rejecting United States Request to Dismiss Russian Draft on Missile Treaty, Members Grant Chair More Time for Consultations

The growing humanitarian toll of conventional weapons took centre stage in the First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) today during its thematic debate segment, as delegates highlighted the detrimental effects of such weapons on civilian populations in vulnerable and conflict affected regions.

Guyana’s representative, speaking on behalf of the Caribbean Community, said the high incidence of violent crime remains among several challenges to sustainable development in her region. It reduces citizens’ security, impedes socioeconomic development and erodes confidence in nation building while heightening fear among the population, she said.

The representative of Honduras recounted her country’s first hand experience with the dire violence and humanitarian effects caused by the illegal trade of small arms and light weapons, particularly with respect to organized crime and non State actors, including gangs. As the scourge of such weapons is affecting thousands of families, her Government has taken steps to tackle the illegal trade of arms and transnational crime by adopting stricter arms control measures, she said.

Speaking on behalf of a group of countries, Ireland’s delegate expressed particular concern about the impact of explosive weapons in populated areas. The use of such weapons causes long term harm that outlasts the conflicts in which they are used, she said, citing the destruction of housing, schools, hospitals, water and sanitation systems and other critical infrastructure.

Commending the Arms Trade Treaty for making a significant contribution to international and regional peace, security and stability, many delegates called for States and non States Parties to comply with all of the Treaty’s provisions.

However, some speakers said that international assistance and cooperation remain essential for its implementation, calling on developed States to render more technical and financial assistance to developing countries towards that end.

Morocco’s representative, meanwhile, speaking on behalf of the Group of African States, urged States to implement the Treaty in a manner that reaffirms the sovereignty of all nations to acquire, manufacture, export, import and retain conventional arms, their parts and components for their self defence and security needs.

Many speakers noted the positive outcomes of the third Review Conference of the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects. The representative of Egypt highlighted the Programme of Action on Small Arms as an essential multilateral tool that contributes to the eradication of illicit trafficking, as is the International Tracing Instrument. However, he raised concerns about the severe threats facing the Middle East and Africa due to the increasing illicit flows of these weapons to terrorists and illegal armed groups.

Prior to the thematic debate, the Committee considered a point of order raised by the representative of the United States about the Russian Federation’s late submission of a draft resolution on the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, formally known as the Treaty between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Elimination of Their Intermediate Range and Shorter Range Missiles. He requested that the Committee Chair dismiss the Russian draft, saying it was submitted one week past the 18 October deadline. The Russian Federation’s delegate then explained that the decision to submit the draft after the official deadline was the result of force majeure circumstances arising from announcements by the United States about its intended withdrawal from the Treaty and its intention to augment its nuclear capacities.

After the Committee Chair asked for more time for consultations, the representative of the United States challenged the decision, requesting an immediate vote on his point of order under rule 113. The Committee Secretary clarified that, in accordance with rule 113, the Chair’s ruling will stand unless overruled by a majority of Member States. By a recorded vote of 34 in favour to 77 against, with 12 abstentions, the Committee then decided to uphold the Chair’s ruling to allow more time for consultations.

Others speaking today were the representatives of Finland (on behalf of the Nordic countries), Latvia, United States, Switzerland, Canada, Paraguay and Jamaica, as well as the European Union.

The First Committee will meet again at 10 a.m. on Friday, 26 October, to continue its work.

Background

The First Committee (Disarmament and International Security) met this morning to continue thematic debates conventional weapons and on the disarmament aspects of outer space. For background information, see Press Release GA/DIS/3597 of 8 October.

Point of Order

The representative of the United States, speaking on a point of order, said the Russian Federation’s delegation circulated a new draft resolution on 25 October, one week after the 18 October deadline. As such, he asked the Chair to rule out consideration of the draft, which was also leaked to the Russian press before being shared with any First Committee member. Bringing a bilateral issue into the body’s work sets a bad precedent.

The representative of the Russian Federation said recent developments compelled his country to immediately react to a situation it deemed critical concerning the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty [Treaty between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Elimination of Their Intermediate-Range and Shorter-Range Missiles]. Following the United States President’s announcement of its withdrawal from the Treaty and a subsequent statement about intentions to build up its nuclear arsenal, the Russian Federation sees these as two links in one chain. The international community will soon encounter a new reality, which will lead to a new arms race. Furthermore, during the First Committee’s debates on the nuclear cluster, many Member States supported the Treaty and called for continued Russian United States dialogue, with the aim of safeguarding the instrument and resolving mutual concerns, while stressing its importance as the cornerstone of European and international security. Disagreeing with his United States counterpart that the resolution concerns a bilateral issue, he said Washington, D.C.’s withdrawal from the Treaty will affect the security of some 40 European States. Indeed, the Treaty is a critical component of national, regional and international security, he said, noting that the Russian Federation’s decision to introduce a draft resolution after the official deadline was the result of force majeure circumstances due to the United States’ decision to withdraw from the Treaty and announce the build up of its nuclear capacities. The international community is simply obligated under those circumstances to address this critical situation. Describing the draft resolution, he said it is mainly rooted in previous resolutions adopted by the General Assembly and aims at reinforcing the viability of the Treaty, as well as encouraging further consultations between the United States and the Russian Federation to resolve existing concerns. He called upon all delegations to support his delegation’s initiative to submit the draft resolution, which constitutes a response to the statements issued by many States.

The representative of the United States took the floor again to request that the Chair rule on his point of order immediately under rule 113.

The Committee Chair requested time to consult about the matter.

The representative of the United States then requested an immediate vote on document A/C.1/73/CRP.1, which outlines Committee deadlines for the submission of drafts.

The representative of the Russian Federation, requesting clarification on the implications of such a vote, said his delegation could not comply with such a banal rule of procedure as this is an urgent matter of international security. There is no need to play these games, he said. The United States withdrawal from the Treaty is a spark that could cause flames in Europe and around the world. He said it is akin to one’s doctor asking if he can read a medical manual whilst a patient is having a heart attack. Would that be amenable? he wondered.

The representative of the United States repeated his request for a vote and pointed out to the Russian Federation’s delegate that the Security Council is the appropriate forum for urgent matters of international security.

The Secretary of the Committee clarified that, in accordance with rule 113, the Chair’s ruling shall stand unless overruled by a majority of Member States. A vote in favour means supporting the immediate consideration of the question of whether the Committee should consider the draft resolution after the deadline, while a vote against will allow the Chair to hold further consultations.

With a recorded vote of 77 against to 34 in favour, with 12 abstentions, the Committee rejected the United States’ request to overrule the Chair’s decision to allow more time for consultations.

Conventional Weapons

AAHDE LAHMIRI (Morocco), speaking on behalf of the Group of African States, expressed deep concern over the illicit trade, transfer and circulation of small arms and light weapons and their excessive accumulation and uncontrolled spread in many regions of the world, especially in light of their wide range of humanitarian and socioeconomic consequences on the continent. Welcoming the successful conclusion in June of the third review conference on the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects, she urged States to their implement obligations.

Despite a range of region specific initiatives, she said international assistance and cooperation remain essential ingredients for the full implementation of the Programme of Action on Small Arms. Calling on Member States from the developed world to render more technical and financial assistance to developing countries, she urged States to implement the Arms Trade Treaty in a balanced manner that reaffirms the sovereign rights of States to acquire, manufacture, export, import and retain conventional arms, their parts and components for their self defence and security needs, in accordance with the United Nations Charter.

JARMO VIINANEN (Finland), speaking on behalf of the Nordic Countries, said the third Review Conference on the Programme of Action on Small Arms found consensus on highlighting, for the first time, the importance of combatting gender based violence through small arms control initiatives. States also agreed to mainstream gender dimensions when implementing the Programme of Action and the International Tracing Instrument while improving the collection of data disaggregated by gender on the illicit arms trade. These are tangible and forward looking steps, he said. Controlling the flows of small arms and light weapons and ammunition concerns both disarmament and development.

While the Arms Trade Treaty continues to be a high priority for the Nordic countries, he said regulating the global arms trade is not an easy endeavour. As such, he expressed appreciation to Japan for leading the Treaty process for the past year, including working groups focused on practical issues. The European Union remains strongly committed to the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons and its protocols. Meanwhile, the Group of Governmental Experts on lethal autonomous weapons systems has been a useful format in increasing awareness and bringing States closer to a common understanding on the development and use of new technologies. The Nordic countries are also strong supporters of humanitarian mine action and of the implementation and universalization of the Ottawa Convention.

RUDOLPH MICHAEL TEN POW (Guyana), speaking on behalf of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), said the high incidence of violent crime remains among several challenges to sustainable development in the region. It reduces citizens’ security, impedes socioeconomic development and erodes confidence in nation building while heightening fear among the population. Caribbean States therefore recognize a need to combat violent crime in the region and its main drivers, including the illegal proliferation of small arms and light weapons and their ammunition.

The Arms Trade Treaty makes a significant contribution to international and regional peace, security and stability, he said. The Secretary General’s new disarmament agenda observes that civilians continue to bear the brunt of armed conflict around the global. The same is true in his region, he said, calling on all States parties to comply with all of the Treaty’s provisions, and non States parties to halt arms transfers that violate the instrument. Those who have not ratified the Treaty should do so as a matter of urgency, he said, adding that investing in or financing prohibited weapons undermines the international legal framework that governs their prohibition.

VIKTOR DVORA�K, of the European Union delegation, voiced support for an integrated approach targeting the root causes of violent conflict, bearing in mind that illicit, poorly regulated flows of arms contribute to instability and have a wide range of humanitarian and socioeconomic consequences. The European Union is finalizing a review of its 2005 small arms and light weapons strategy, addressing all phases in the life cycle of small arms and their ammunition. Transfer controls are an important tool, he said, calling on Member States to join the Arms Trade Treaty.

He said a good example of effective multilateralism is the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction, known as the Ottawa Convention. But, new large scale contamination by anti personnel mines are still being reported in several countries. The use of such devices in urban warfare aimed at civilians is particularly worrying. The European Union will continue to support efforts addressing new mine threats and the issue of legacy contamination while taking steps to universalize the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons. All States have a responsibility to ensure that their current and emerging weapons systems comply with the requirements of international law, he said, adding that human beings must make the decision to use lethal force and maintain control over the weapons they use.

GERALDINE BYRNE NASON (Ireland), speaking on behalf of a group of countries, expressed concern about the devasting impact of explosive weapons in populated areas. She called on Member States to enhance compliance with international humanitarian law and ensure the protection of civilians during armed conflict. The use of explosive weapons in populated areas causes long term harm that outlasts the conflicts in which they are used, she said, citing the destruction of housing, schools, hospitals, water and sanitation systems and other critical infrastructure. Such devastation acts as a catalyst for the displacement of people, rendering refugees vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. It also has a long term impact on the recovery and development of affected communities.

Welcoming the priority attached to explosive weapons in populated areas by the Secretary General’s Agenda for Disarmament, she advocated for the development of a political declaration. In addition, she proposed the creation of common standards and operational policies. As part of broader efforts, the group of countries will continue to support civil society initiatives to address the challenges posed by such weapons.

ANDREJS PILDEGOVICS (Latvia) said combatants once accounted for 90 per cent of conflict related casualties, but today, 90 per cent of casualties in armed conflicts are civilians. Conventional arms kill around 500,000 people per year, out of which 70,000 are killed in conflict zones. These figures clearly demonstrate that the international community must focus on weapons of mass destruction and conventional weapons. In this respect, Latvia welcomes the Secretary General’s Agenda for Disarmament that spotlights conventional arms. Having ratified the Arms Trade Treaty in 2014, Latvia assumed the presidency of the Arms Trade Treaty in August and will prioritize gender and arms related gender based violence. Universality of the Arms Trade Treaty is key to creating a world without violence caused by illegal weapons.

IRMA ALEJANDRINA ROSA SUAZO (Honduras) said her country has first hand experience with the dire violence and humanitarian effects caused by the illegal trade of small arms and light weapons, particularly with respect to organized crime and non State actors, including gangs. As the scourge of such weapons is affecting thousands of families, the Government has taken steps to tackle the illegal trade of arms and transnational crime by adopting stricter arms control measures. To enhance the fight against crime, Honduras is committed to reducing the illicit trade through the Central American Programme on Small Arms Control. This helps to curb gun violence and contributes to the strengthening of criminal justice systems, she said, adding that her Government has proposed a law regulating private security services and has ratified the Arms Trade Treaty. Cooperation and international assistance in the field are vital, with developing countries having inadequate resources and institutional structures to fight against criminal groups with ample funding obtained from criminal activities.

ROBERT WOOD (United States) said the Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons is an important instrument because it has brought together States with diverse national security concerns. In particular, the United States supports the outcome of the Group of Governmental Experts on lethal autonomous weapons systems and its recent successful and productive session, despite efforts by some States to politicize discussions. Regarding the Programme of Action on Small Arms, he called for building on the momentum of work in the third Review Conference, rather than creating unattainable or unnecessary requirements, particularly those outside the instrument’s scope. On man portable air defence systems, he said his country continues to work with partners to deter their illicit trafficking and use, he said, adding that the United States remains the world’s single largest financial supporter of conventional weapons destruction programmes, providing more than $3.2 billion in assistance to more than 100 countries since 1993.

SABRINA DALLAFIOR (Switzerland) said the preservation and strengthening of the rules based international order is a priority. Member States should not question fundamental concepts of international humanitarian law. Instead, human rights law must be complied with under all circumstances. The increasing urbanization of conflicts and its effects on civilian populations and infrastructure underline a need for a two pronged approach. The behaviour of some States with regard to current armed conflicts raises questions about their compliance with international humanitarian law. She urged parties to armed conflict to comply with their international obligations and called for accountability for any violations. Additionally, concrete measures are needed to improve compliance with international humanitarian law when conducting hostile actions in urban areas, and her Government welcomes efforts to take forward discussion on the issue.

BASSEM YEHIA HASSAN KASSEM HASSAN (Egypt), associating himself with the Arab Group, African Group and the Non Aligned Movement, said the Programme of Action on Small Arms is an essential multilateral tool that contributes to the eradication of illicit trafficking, as is the International Tracing Instrument. The Middle East and Africa face severe threats due to the increasing illicit flows of these weapons to terrorists and illegal armed groups. This unprecedented flood of arms is conducted with the direct support of a few States that resort to arming terrorists as a tool of their foreign policies, in a clear violation of the United Nations Charter, international norms and several Security Council resolutions. Raising other concerns, he said Egypt is one of the States that has suffered the most from the use of anti personnel mines. Noting that about 20 per cent of the world’s landmines were planted in Egyptian soil during the Second World War, he emphasized a need to intensify international cooperation to address the problem.

KAYA DUNAWA PICKARD (Canada) said that while weapons of mass destruction pose an acute threat to humanity, conventional weapons kill and injure thousands of people annually and perpetuate gender based violence. Her country is encouraged by how they figured in recent discussions of the Programme of Action on Small Arms. She also cited the Small Arms Survey’s recent research into illicit arms flows, which included increased participation of women in multilateral policy making and gender analysis of arms control. Looking at disarmament from a humanitarian impact perspective, she called on States to sign the Convention on Cluster Munitions to rid the world of these weapons by 2030. Canada prioritizes accession to the Arms Trade Treaty and, as president of the Group of Seven in 2018, ensures that conventional weapons are a focus of discussion.

ENRIQUE JOSA� MARA�A CARRILLO GA�MEZ (Paraguay) called on Member States to ratify or accede to the Arms Trade Treaty and all related instruments on conventional weapons. Concerning the implementation of international commitments, he said legitimate defence should not be use as justification for the proliferation of such weapons. He highlighted a need to promote the participation of women in debates, decisions and measures on conventional arms and to offer resources and technology for developing countries to combat the illicit trafficking of conventional weapons. Addressing the importance of achieving Sustainable Development Goal 16.4, he highlighted ways to cross link resources through international cooperation. He welcomed the voluntary contributions of the Trust Fund of the Arms Trade Treaty, which funded a project in his country that included training for Government officials and ways to detect small arms components through customs.

DIEDRE NICHOLE MILLS (Jamaica), associating herself with CARICOM, said that while her country is not a manufacturer or net importer of conventional weapons, it is vulnerable to violent crimes associated with the illicit trade of small arms and light weapons due to porous borders and its location. Jamaica has been working to ensure that legislative, policy and operational measures are in place to prevent the illicit proliferation of small arms, including a review of the Firearms Act that will establish a firearms registry, national inter agency committee and a national control list. In addition, Jamaica now has a standard manual for marking firearms, provides specialized training for law enforcement and works with private security firms to improve the regulatory framework governing the industry. Welcoming various reviews undertaken in 2018, she expressed hope that the United Nations Regional Centre for Peace, Disarmament and Development in Latin America and the Caribbean will be appropriately resourced.

Source: United Nations