Daily Archives: June 10, 2018

Half the World’s 152 Million Child Laborers Do Hazardous Work

The International Labor Organization reports 152 million children are victims of child labor, with nearly half forced to work in hazardous, unhealthy conditions that can result in death and injury.

Twenty years ago, hundreds of people, including children, participated in the Global March against Child Labor. They came to the International Labor Conference in Geneva demanding a Convention on the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labor.

Basu Rai from Nepal was the youngest of the marchers. Now, a grown man he recalls clambering on table tops chanting slogans.

“Go, Go Global March. Stop, Stop Child Labor. We want education. No more tools in tiny hands. We want books and we want toys,” he said.

Rai was orphaned at age four. Homeless and without anyone to look after him, he became a street gangster, a rag picker, a delivery boy. He did anything to survive. Now, as an adult, he has become a Child Rights Activist.

“But, still I am afraid because I am a father to a two-month old daughter and then because the world is not safe for the children. So, this is our collective responsibility to work together for the sake of the childhoodBut, still there are 152 million children who are languishing in a kind of slavery,” said Rai.

Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian children’s rights activist and Nobel peace prize laureate, led the 1998 Global March of enslaved and trafficked children. He said progress has been made since then, but much remains to be done.

“If the children are still trapped into the supply chain, if the children are still enslaved, if the children are still sold and bought like animals and sometimes for less than the price of animals to work in fields and farms, and shops and factories, or for household work as domestic help, this is a blot on humanity,” said Satyarthi.

The ILO reports nearly half of the child laborers are found in Africa and in the Asia and Pacific regions. Sub-Saharan Africa has the largest proportion with one in five children working.

It notes children typically enter the work force at the age of six or seven, getting involved in hazardous work as they get older. About 70 percent of hazardous work is concentrated in agriculture. Other forms include mining, construction, and domestic service.

ILO Director-General, Guy Ryder, said the world is facing an epidemic of occupational accidents and disease.

“Honestly, the annual toll is appalling � 2.78 million work-related deaths, 374 million injuries and illnesses. If these were the victims of a war, we would be talking a lot about it. Children and young workers are at greater risk and suffer disproportionately and with longer lasting consequences,” he said.

Ryder says legislation, labor inspection, and workplace labor relations and practices must be strengthened to stop this carnage.

Most child laborers are in the developing world. But, this shameful practice also occurs in some of the world’s richest countries. Zulema Lopez, a Child Rights Activist and Labor Relations student in the United States recalls her life as a child.

“At the age of seven, it was normal for me to wake up at five o’clock in the morning, put on my shoes, put on a T-shirt and go work in the hot sun, burning � my back was aching, 20-30 pounds of buckets of cucumbers next to me, trying to make ends meet,” said Lopez.

Lopez said people do not realize what is happening in their own backyard. She calls the exploitative work that robs children of their childhood unacceptable and said it must stop. She said children are the future and if people fail to protect the world’s children, then there is little hope for the future.

Source: Voice of America

Half the World’s 152 Million Child Laborers Do Hazardous Work

The International Labor Organization reports 152 million children are victims of child labor, with nearly half forced to work in hazardous, unhealthy conditions that can result in death and injury.

Twenty years ago, hundreds of people, including children, participated in the Global March against Child Labor. They came to the International Labor Conference in Geneva demanding a Convention on the Elimination of the Worst Forms of Child Labor.

Basu Rai from Nepal was the youngest of the marchers. Now, a grown man he recalls clambering on table tops chanting slogans.

“Go, Go Global March. Stop, Stop Child Labor. We want education. No more tools in tiny hands. We want books and we want toys,” he said.

Rai was orphaned at age four. Homeless and without anyone to look after him, he became a street gangster, a rag picker, a delivery boy. He did anything to survive. Now, as an adult, he has become a Child Rights Activist.

“But, still I am afraid because I am a father to a two-month old daughter and then because the world is not safe for the children. So, this is our collective responsibility to work together for the sake of the childhoodBut, still there are 152 million children who are languishing in a kind of slavery,” said Rai.

Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian children’s rights activist and Nobel peace prize laureate, led the 1998 Global March of enslaved and trafficked children. He said progress has been made since then, but much remains to be done.

“If the children are still trapped into the supply chain, if the children are still enslaved, if the children are still sold and bought like animals and sometimes for less than the price of animals to work in fields and farms, and shops and factories, or for household work as domestic help, this is a blot on humanity,” said Satyarthi.

The ILO reports nearly half of the child laborers are found in Africa and in the Asia and Pacific regions. Sub-Saharan Africa has the largest proportion with one in five children working.

It notes children typically enter the work force at the age of six or seven, getting involved in hazardous work as they get older. About 70 percent of hazardous work is concentrated in agriculture. Other forms include mining, construction, and domestic service.

ILO Director-General, Guy Ryder, said the world is facing an epidemic of occupational accidents and disease.

“Honestly, the annual toll is appalling � 2.78 million work-related deaths, 374 million injuries and illnesses. If these were the victims of a war, we would be talking a lot about it. Children and young workers are at greater risk and suffer disproportionately and with longer lasting consequences,” he said.

Ryder says legislation, labor inspection, and workplace labor relations and practices must be strengthened to stop this carnage.

Most child laborers are in the developing world. But, this shameful practice also occurs in some of the world’s richest countries. Zulema Lopez, a Child Rights Activist and Labor Relations student in the United States recalls her life as a child.

“At the age of seven, it was normal for me to wake up at five o’clock in the morning, put on my shoes, put on a T-shirt and go work in the hot sun, burning � my back was aching, 20-30 pounds of buckets of cucumbers next to me, trying to make ends meet,” said Lopez.

Lopez said people do not realize what is happening in their own backyard. She calls the exploitative work that robs children of their childhood unacceptable and said it must stop. She said children are the future and if people fail to protect the world’s children, then there is little hope for the future.

Source: Voice of America

President Ramaphosa concludes successful visit to Canada

Canada – President Ramaphosa has today, 10 June 2018, concluded his working visit to Canada where he participated in the G7 Leaders’ Outreach Summit held in Quebec City, under the theme Healthy, Productive and Resilient Oceans and Seas, Coasts and Communities

South Africa’s participation in the two-day session was at the invitation of the host country Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. President Ramaphosa was accompanied by Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa and a business delegation from South Africa.

In line with the President’s stated drive to attract investment to grow the economy and create jobs, as well as reduce poverty and inequality the President had an opportunity to engage with representatives of the business community in Toronto.

The President has welcomed the interest shown by the global business community in South Africa as an investment destination and lauded the wonderful exchange of views in a session he described as oversold. President Ramaphosa regards this interest as demonstrating a recognition of South Africa’s new dawn – a period of renewal and rebuilding.

The President further described the G7 Outreach Summit as a success and stressed the importance of the strong political signal delivered by the G7 Leaders’ Outreach focus on developing and implementing innovative strategies to leapfrog the global effort to address issues facing the world’s oceans, including stressors such as plastic pollution, building the resilience of coasts and communities, improving the protection of the world’s oceans and ensuring sustainable use of marine resources. He further noted the paramount importance of strengthening the multi-lateral approach to managing ocean resources beyond national jurisdiction in these efforts.

The President welcomed the opportunity presented for countries to share their experiences, with South Africa reflecting on its own milestones, successes and challenges in relation to management of our oceans as a resource to drive economic growth.

In this regard, the President shared, amongst others, South Africa’s strategy to research and develop alternatives and substitutes for single-use plastics. These actions by South Africa are complemented with cooperative strategies to expand marine protected areas, address over-exploitation through Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fisheries detection and enforcement and supported by an integrated, shared ocean information system as a basis for the sustainable management of the oceans and its users.

The President is confident that preserving and opening up the ocean economy has a potential to create approximately one million jobs from various activities including shipbuilding, sea transportation, aquaculture and exploration of oil and gas, amongst others.

On the sidelines of the Summit, President Ramaphosa held a number of bilateral engagements with Heads of State and Government from various countries including Norway, France, Germany, Vietnam, Rwanda, Kenya and the host country, Canada.

President Ramaphosa returns to South Africa greatly encouraged by the commitment by global leaders to harness the potential of our oceans for development and the very strong message from the G7 Outreach Summit to place youth and women in particular at the centre of efforts to make inequality history.

Source: The Presidency Republic of South Africa

President Ramaphosa concludes successful visit to Canada

Canada – President Ramaphosa has today, 10 June 2018, concluded his working visit to Canada where he participated in the G7 Leaders’ Outreach Summit held in Quebec City, under the theme Healthy, Productive and Resilient Oceans and Seas, Coasts and Communities

South Africa’s participation in the two-day session was at the invitation of the host country Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. President Ramaphosa was accompanied by Environmental Affairs Minister Edna Molewa and a business delegation from South Africa.

In line with the President’s stated drive to attract investment to grow the economy and create jobs, as well as reduce poverty and inequality the President had an opportunity to engage with representatives of the business community in Toronto.

The President has welcomed the interest shown by the global business community in South Africa as an investment destination and lauded the wonderful exchange of views in a session he described as oversold. President Ramaphosa regards this interest as demonstrating a recognition of South Africa’s new dawn – a period of renewal and rebuilding.

The President further described the G7 Outreach Summit as a success and stressed the importance of the strong political signal delivered by the G7 Leaders’ Outreach focus on developing and implementing innovative strategies to leapfrog the global effort to address issues facing the world’s oceans, including stressors such as plastic pollution, building the resilience of coasts and communities, improving the protection of the world’s oceans and ensuring sustainable use of marine resources. He further noted the paramount importance of strengthening the multi-lateral approach to managing ocean resources beyond national jurisdiction in these efforts.

The President welcomed the opportunity presented for countries to share their experiences, with South Africa reflecting on its own milestones, successes and challenges in relation to management of our oceans as a resource to drive economic growth.

In this regard, the President shared, amongst others, South Africa’s strategy to research and develop alternatives and substitutes for single-use plastics. These actions by South Africa are complemented with cooperative strategies to expand marine protected areas, address over-exploitation through Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated fisheries detection and enforcement and supported by an integrated, shared ocean information system as a basis for the sustainable management of the oceans and its users.

The President is confident that preserving and opening up the ocean economy has a potential to create approximately one million jobs from various activities including shipbuilding, sea transportation, aquaculture and exploration of oil and gas, amongst others.

On the sidelines of the Summit, President Ramaphosa held a number of bilateral engagements with Heads of State and Government from various countries including Norway, France, Germany, Vietnam, Rwanda, Kenya and the host country, Canada.

President Ramaphosa returns to South Africa greatly encouraged by the commitment by global leaders to harness the potential of our oceans for development and the very strong message from the G7 Outreach Summit to place youth and women in particular at the centre of efforts to make inequality history.

Source: The Presidency Republic of South Africa

Pentagon Identifies US Soldier Killed in Somalia

The Pentagon has identified the U.S. soldier killed in Somalia as Staff Sgt. Alexander Conrad, 26, of Arizona.

Four other commandos were injured in the attack Friday. The U.S. Africa Command said the injured were being treated by the medical staff at the U.S. Embassy in Kenya. Their names were not released.

Conrad was attached to the 1st Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group, in Fort Bragg, North Carolina.

The U.S. special operations forces were fighting alongside Somali and Kenyan troops to clear al-Shabab militants from the area “and establish a permanent combat outpost,” U.S. Africa Command said.

Witnesses said the attack took place near the town of Sanguni in Jubaland, while the U.S. Somali and Kenyan troops were digging trenches and setting up other defenses.

They said the militants first set off a series of explosions before targeting the forces with heavy gunfire and mortar rounds.

A helicopter was brought in to evacuate the wounded.

The al-Qaida-linked al-Shabab’s Shahada News Agency quickly claimed responsibility for the attack via the social media platform Telegram.

“Shabaab al-Mujahideen Movement fighters mounted a fierce attack in a military base of American and Somali forces,” the report said, according to a translation by the SITE Intelligence Group.

Despite the attack, U.S. officials say the Somali and Kenyan forces were able to complete the outpost, and that the Somali government will be able to use it to push al-Shabab from the region.

The death of the U.S. soldier in Somalia is the second in the past two years.

In May 2017, a U.S. Navy SEAL was killed near the village of Dar e Salam in Somalia’s Lower Shabelle region.

Source: Voice of America