Daily Archives: June 6, 2018

Minister Edna Molewa welcomes arrest of alleged rhino poachers

Minister of Environmental Affairs welcomes arrest of alleged rhino poachers

The Minister of Environmental Affairs, Dr Edna Molewa, has hailed the arrest of two people in Gauteng for allegedly dealing in rhino horn as an affirmation of the need for greater multi-sectoral collaboration to address rhino poaching.

Mandla Mashele, 37, and Kelvin Malapane, 38, have been charged with illegally buying rhino horn in contravention in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (NEMBA).

They handed themselves over to the Benoni police last week following a raid on a premises in Daveyton in Gauteng in May. The men appeared in court on 30 May 2018 and were granted bail of R50 000 each. The case has been postponed to 13 July 2018 for further investigation.

Minister Molewa has congratulated the investigating team comprising the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (Hawks), the Environmental Management Inspectorate (Green Scorpions) and SANParks for the breakthrough that led to the arrests.

This two-year investigation resulted in the team being able to identify the criminal supply chain and receivers of rhino horn in Gauteng a prime example of the winning formula of the Integrated Strategic Management Approach Cabinet adopted in 2014.

The implementation plan for the Integrated Strategic Management Approach lays the foundations for the Department’s anti- rhino poaching efforts; bolstered by the SAPS Draft National Integrated Strategy to Combat Wildlife Trafficking. The number of rhino poached in South Africa has been on a steady decline, largely the result of the success of this approach.

The Minister added that the arrest and conviction of those suspected of rhino poaching and associated activities sends a strong message that this crime will not be tolerated.

Source: Government of South Africa

Minister Edna Molewa welcomes arrest of alleged rhino poachers

Minister of Environmental Affairs welcomes arrest of alleged rhino poachers

The Minister of Environmental Affairs, Dr Edna Molewa, has hailed the arrest of two people in Gauteng for allegedly dealing in rhino horn as an affirmation of the need for greater multi-sectoral collaboration to address rhino poaching.

Mandla Mashele, 37, and Kelvin Malapane, 38, have been charged with illegally buying rhino horn in contravention in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (NEMBA).

They handed themselves over to the Benoni police last week following a raid on a premises in Daveyton in Gauteng in May. The men appeared in court on 30 May 2018 and were granted bail of R50 000 each. The case has been postponed to 13 July 2018 for further investigation.

Minister Molewa has congratulated the investigating team comprising the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (Hawks), the Environmental Management Inspectorate (Green Scorpions) and SANParks for the breakthrough that led to the arrests.

This two-year investigation resulted in the team being able to identify the criminal supply chain and receivers of rhino horn in Gauteng a prime example of the winning formula of the Integrated Strategic Management Approach Cabinet adopted in 2014.

The implementation plan for the Integrated Strategic Management Approach lays the foundations for the Department’s anti- rhino poaching efforts; bolstered by the SAPS Draft National Integrated Strategy to Combat Wildlife Trafficking. The number of rhino poached in South Africa has been on a steady decline, largely the result of the success of this approach.

The Minister added that the arrest and conviction of those suspected of rhino poaching and associated activities sends a strong message that this crime will not be tolerated.

Source: Government of South Africa

Europe Accused of Failing Migrants in Libya as Human Traffickers Thrive

Rising populism across Europe is fueling human trafficking in Libya where a growing number of migrants are being trapped in detention centers and sold into slavery, aid officials told a conference on modern-day slavery on Wednesday.

The rise of anti-immigration political parties in nations from Italy to Slovenia and Europe-wide efforts to stem migration means more migrants in Libya are struggling to leave and are falling into the hands of traffickers, several experts said.

A video appearing to show Africans sold as slaves in Libya sparked a global outcry last year and put the spotlight on the lawless nation where thousands of migrants are held, tortured, and even killed, say the United Nations and rights groups.

“It is more difficult [for migrants] to leave Libya now … and the traffickers have to monetize their investments,” said U.N. refugee agency (UNHCR) senior official Vincent Cochetel.

“They sell people, they lease them, they rent them,” the UNHCR Special Envoy for the Central Mediterranean told the Thomson Foundation’s one-day Trust Conference at the European Parliament in Brussels.

The number of migrants reaching Italy has fallen sharply since last July when a major smuggling group in Libya struck a deal to halt departures under Italian pressure.

Libya’s coastguard has also returned more migrants after intercepting them at sea with backing from the European Union.

European countries need to do more to stop illegal trade in Libya in inflatable boats which are bought from China and exported through the continent, and enforce a European Union ruling to limit their sale, according to Cochetel.

“These dinghy boats have killed more people than the country’s civil war since 2011,” he added.

About 140 East African migrants escaped from traffickers holding them captive near the Libyan town of Bani Walid last month, with several hospitalized due to torture during captivity or efforts to recapture them, the U.N. migration agency said.

“Several of these people were brought to detention centers when they should have been treated as victims of trafficking,” said Inma Vazquez, representative to the EU and NATO for global aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres [Doctors Without Borders]. “We are seeing people physically and mentally broken with burns, scars on their backs and legs broken in several parts.”

Pierre Vimont, a former head of the European Union’s foreign service, said the number of migrants trapped in Libya is likely to increase further as populism sweeps across Europe in countries including Italy, Austria and Germany.

Italy’s new interior minister Matteo Salvini this week said his country would not be Europe’s “refugee camp,” having seen more than 600,000 migrants arrive since 2014, and vowed tough action to reduce arrivals and send back migrants.

“Europe is looking to push back this migration wave … to see how they can contain and push back migrants,” said Vimont, adding that more needed to be done to stop people leaving African nations trying to reach Europe.

“But the problem with their reaction is that they are behind the curve, reacting too late. They don’t know how to act.”

Source: Voice of America

Response of the spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Alexandros Yennimatas, to a journalist’s question on statements from the spokesperson of the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the European Programme “Natura 2000”

The spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Alexandros Yennimatas, made the following comment in response to a journalist’s question on statements from the spokesperson of the Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs regarding the European Programme Natura 2000:

The legal status of the Aegean and, by extension, Greece’s right to exercise its sovereign rights that derive from international law, which certainly include the designation of regions with protected ecosystems, cannot be disputed.

Turkey only recently officially restated its intention to stay on course for accession to the European Union. It is obvious that the first thing Turkey needs to do if it wants to succeed is to respect international law and the European acquis.

Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Hellenic Republic

President Ramaphosa to address the Afrikanerbond Centenary Celebrations

President Cyril Ramaphosa will tomorrow, 07 June 2018, address the Afrikanerbond Centenary Celebrations (Bondsradd) in Paarl, Cape Town, as part of engaging key stakeholders towards building a prosperous South Africa.

The Afrikanerbond was established on 05 June 1918 to look after the economic and cultural interests of the Afrikaner community and is this year celebrating its centenary during its National General Meeting (Bondsraad) scheduled for 7-8 June 2018.

President Ramaphosa’s attendance will provide an opportunity for him to engage the Afrikanerbond openly about his vision for the country which is to rally all South Africans to do anything they can in their walks of life or circles of influence to support and add impetus to government’s endeavours to build a prosperous and united society.

Source: The Presidency Republic of South Africa