Daily Archives: May 13, 2018

South African Photographer of Iconic Protest Image Dies

Tributes are being paid following the death of Sam Nzima, the South African photographer who took the iconic image of a black high school student carrying a fatally wounded fellow student away from the gunfire of apartheid police in the Soweto student riots of 1976.

Nzima, 83, died Saturday night in a hospital in the northwestern city of Nelspruit, said his son, Thulani Nzima. He said the photographer had collapsed two days earlier but did not recover in the hospital.

Nzima’s photograph of the Soweto student uprising galvanized international public opinion against apartheid, South Africa’s system of racial discrimination that ended in 1994.

“Sam Nzima was one of a kind,” said President Cyril Ramaphosa, in a statement Sunday. “His camera captured the full brutality of apartheid oppression on the nation’s psyche and history.”

Nzima’s photo of the dying Hector Pieterson and strength of the student, Mbuyisa Makhubu, carrying him away from the violence “caused the world to come to terms with the brutality and evil of the apartheid system,” said South Africa’s ruling party, the African National Congress, in a statement. “This came at a price to Nzima who was subjected to countless acts of intimidation.”

Harassed by the apartheid regime, Nzima left Johannesburg and in 1998 won the copyright for the much reproduced photo. In his later years he taught photography to young students in rural Bushbuckridge.

Source: Voice of America

South African Photographer of Iconic Protest Image Dies

Tributes are being paid following the death of Sam Nzima, the South African photographer who took the iconic image of a black high school student carrying a fatally wounded fellow student away from the gunfire of apartheid police in the Soweto student riots of 1976.

Nzima, 83, died Saturday night in a hospital in the northwestern city of Nelspruit, said his son, Thulani Nzima. He said the photographer had collapsed two days earlier but did not recover in the hospital.

Nzima’s photograph of the Soweto student uprising galvanized international public opinion against apartheid, South Africa’s system of racial discrimination that ended in 1994.

“Sam Nzima was one of a kind,” said President Cyril Ramaphosa, in a statement Sunday. “His camera captured the full brutality of apartheid oppression on the nation’s psyche and history.”

Nzima’s photo of the dying Hector Pieterson and strength of the student, Mbuyisa Makhubu, carrying him away from the violence “caused the world to come to terms with the brutality and evil of the apartheid system,” said South Africa’s ruling party, the African National Congress, in a statement. “This came at a price to Nzima who was subjected to countless acts of intimidation.”

Harassed by the apartheid regime, Nzima left Johannesburg and in 1998 won the copyright for the much reproduced photo. In his later years he taught photography to young students in rural Bushbuckridge.

Source: Voice of America

First China-Built Aircraft Carrier Begins Sea Trials

China’s first domestically built aircraft carrier has begun sea trials.

The still-unnamed ship left the northern port of Dalian early Sunday to “test the reliability and stability of its propulsion and other system,” the Defense Ministry said in a statement.

The 50,000-ton carrier will likely be formally commissioned sometime before 2020 following the completion of sea trials and the arrival of its full air complement.

The ship’s design is based on the former Soviet Union’s Kuznetsov class, with a ski jump-style deck for taking off and a conventional oil-fueled steam turbine power plant.

The carrier will be the second to enter the Chinese navy. The first, the Liaoning, was bought second-hand from Ukraine, refitted in China and commissioned in 2012.

State media reports say China is also planning to build a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier capable of remaining at sea for long durations.

China has the world’s largest navy in terms of numbers of ships, although it lags far behind the U.S. in technology and combat capabilities.

The Chinese military has undergone rapid modernization since President Xi Jinping took power five years ago.

The Chinese navy, especially, has been used to assert Beijing’s claim to virtually the entire South China Sea and is increasingly ranging farther into the Pacific and Indian oceans.

Last year, China established its first overseas military base in the Horn of Africa nation of Djibouti, where rivals such as the U.S., Japan and several European nations also have a permanent presence.

Source: Voice of America

First China-Built Aircraft Carrier Begins Sea Trials

China’s first domestically built aircraft carrier has begun sea trials.

The still-unnamed ship left the northern port of Dalian early Sunday to “test the reliability and stability of its propulsion and other system,” the Defense Ministry said in a statement.

The 50,000-ton carrier will likely be formally commissioned sometime before 2020 following the completion of sea trials and the arrival of its full air complement.

The ship’s design is based on the former Soviet Union’s Kuznetsov class, with a ski jump-style deck for taking off and a conventional oil-fueled steam turbine power plant.

The carrier will be the second to enter the Chinese navy. The first, the Liaoning, was bought second-hand from Ukraine, refitted in China and commissioned in 2012.

State media reports say China is also planning to build a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier capable of remaining at sea for long durations.

China has the world’s largest navy in terms of numbers of ships, although it lags far behind the U.S. in technology and combat capabilities.

The Chinese military has undergone rapid modernization since President Xi Jinping took power five years ago.

The Chinese navy, especially, has been used to assert Beijing’s claim to virtually the entire South China Sea and is increasingly ranging farther into the Pacific and Indian oceans.

Last year, China established its first overseas military base in the Horn of Africa nation of Djibouti, where rivals such as the U.S., Japan and several European nations also have a permanent presence.

Source: Voice of America

President Ramaphosa wishes the Muslim community well for Ramadan

President Cyril Ramaphosa wishes South Africa’s Muslim community well during the Holy Month of Ramadan which commences this week.

The importance and benefits of this Holy Month of fasting, piety and charity extends beyond the lives of Muslims, as it contributes to the spiritual and social wellbeing of all South Africans, said President Ramaphosa.

This is a month that allows all of us to reflect on – and act on – the small, thoughtful things we can do to contribute to a better society.

President Ramaphosa’s thoughts particularly go out to the Muslim community of Verulam, KwaZulu-Natal, who suffered violence and tragedy in a place of worship several days ago.

The President expects that the perpetrators will be brought to book and that the community of Verulam will be able to experience Ramadan as the period of peace and goodwill it is meant to be.

Ramadan Mubarak!

Source: The Presidency Republic of South Africa