Daily Archives: May 4, 2018

Win-Win Cooperation Between CNMC Goldmine Holdings Limited and Shandong Xinhai Mining Technology and Equipment Inc.

YANTAI, China, May 4, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Recently, CNMC Goldmine Holdings Limited (SGX:5TP) forged a strategic partnership with Shandong Xinhai Mining Technology and Equipment Inc. (NEEQ: 836079), in the hope of taking the development of mining industry to a new level through their cooperation.

Their cooperation for the first time brought win-win results in 2017, thus laying a solid foundation for their further collaboration. On the other side, building on its advanced technologies and equipment and professional services, Xinhai is able to help CNMC achieve maximum benefits.

At the signing ceremony, the executive president of CNMC said, “As a publicly listed company in Malaysia, CNMC has taken the lead in Malaysia’s mining sector for two consecutive years. To secure our leading position, we have set high standards for our partners in terms of the quality and quantity of products. With a high level of execution capability and customer-oriented awareness, Xinhai is an influential player in the mining industry and boasts global perspectives and pioneering spirit. Zhang Yunlong, chairman of Xinhai, is a senior mineral processing engineer who proves to be a specialist. He also serves as a fellow member of the Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM).”

Mr Zhang also said, “The cooperation between Xinhai and CNMC has brought fruitful results for us, with the project operating normally. Xinhai is delighted to continue providing services for CNMC. Thanks to its rich overseas EPC project experience, Xinhai is forging ahead with its strategy of expanding businesses to foreign markets.”

Their cooperation drew the wide attention of mass media. The event grabbed the headlines in Malaysia’s three largest Chinese newspapers-Nanyang Siang Pau Malaysia, China Press and Sin Chew Daily. It is expected that Xinhai will continue to offer tailored solutions and world-class services to its clients for years to come while adhering to the principle of “Optimal solutions for your mine!”.

Campaigning Underway in Burundi Ahead of Referendum

Burundi has officially kicked off campaigning ahead of the May 17 referendum, with government officials telling people to vote “yes” to the constitutional changes.

Officials say the amendments would provide a much-needed update to the country’s political system. However, critics say the initiative is all about extending the current president’s rule.

President Pierre Nkurunziza has made clear his opinion on the proposed constitutional changes. Speaking at a rally in the second largest city, Gitega, Wednesday, he warned those who want to vote “no.”

“I would like to declare this to Burundians and those who are not whoever opposes this constitutional changes will meet God’s power,” he declared.

The most controversial proposed amendment deals with presidential term limits a topic that led to deadly unrest Burundi in recent years.

The current term is five years, but the new amendment would give the president a seven-year mandate. The constitution limits the president to two terms, but it is argued that the change would reset the clock for Nkrunziza to run twice more. He has been in office since 2005.

If the referendum passes, Nkurunziza could potentially stay in power until 2034. He told VOA there are threats everywhere

Agathon Rwasa, a former presidential candidate and vice president of the National Assembly, is campaigning for “no.”

“There are threats,” he told VOA. “If they hire to our group, they will be banned, so it’s a big challenge. But we do hope these threats won’t be effective.”

The government has insisted the changes are aimed at strengthening the country’s laws to bring an end to political upheaval.

But human rights groups have expressed concern over the political environment in which the referendum is being held. They say the ruling party youth wing, known as Imobonerakure, is targeting those suspected to be campaigning or are planning to vote against their party’s wishes.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) says opponents of the referendum have faced beatings and arrest in the run-up to the vote. HRW researcher Lewis Mudge says it will be difficult to get a fair result.

“It’s happening in the context of state killings of people who are against Nkurunziza’s third mandate, which we saw significantly in 2015,” he said. “It’s happening in the context in which journalists and civil society have either been locked up or kicked out of the country and in which opposition internally is either muzzled or ceases to exist. So it’s a very worrying perspective in terms of medium and long term.”

VOA, BBC ban

At least 1,200 people have lost their lives since Nkrunziza announced his bid for a third term in 2015, and more than 400,000 Burundians have fled the country.

On Friday, Burundi’s National Communications Council announced a six-month ban on broadcasts by Voice of America and the BBC. The Council said the broadcasters have broken the country’s media laws and engaged in “unethical conduct.”

The United States was a strong critic of the president’s decision to seek a third term in 2015, and more recently denounced the alleged acts of violence against opponents of the referendum.

Source: Voice of America

Campaigning Underway in Burundi Ahead of Referendum

Burundi has officially kicked off campaigning ahead of the May 17 referendum, with government officials telling people to vote “yes” to the constitutional changes.

Officials say the amendments would provide a much-needed update to the country’s political system. However, critics say the initiative is all about extending the current president’s rule.

President Pierre Nkurunziza has made clear his opinion on the proposed constitutional changes. Speaking at a rally in the second largest city, Gitega, Wednesday, he warned those who want to vote “no.”

“I would like to declare this to Burundians and those who are not whoever opposes this constitutional changes will meet God’s power,” he declared.

The most controversial proposed amendment deals with presidential term limits a topic that led to deadly unrest Burundi in recent years.

The current term is five years, but the new amendment would give the president a seven-year mandate. The constitution limits the president to two terms, but it is argued that the change would reset the clock for Nkrunziza to run twice more. He has been in office since 2005.

If the referendum passes, Nkurunziza could potentially stay in power until 2034. He told VOA there are threats everywhere

Agathon Rwasa, a former presidential candidate and vice president of the National Assembly, is campaigning for “no.”

“There are threats,” he told VOA. “If they hire to our group, they will be banned, so it’s a big challenge. But we do hope these threats won’t be effective.”

The government has insisted the changes are aimed at strengthening the country’s laws to bring an end to political upheaval.

But human rights groups have expressed concern over the political environment in which the referendum is being held. They say the ruling party youth wing, known as Imobonerakure, is targeting those suspected to be campaigning or are planning to vote against their party’s wishes.

Human Rights Watch (HRW) says opponents of the referendum have faced beatings and arrest in the run-up to the vote. HRW researcher Lewis Mudge says it will be difficult to get a fair result.

“It’s happening in the context of state killings of people who are against Nkurunziza’s third mandate, which we saw significantly in 2015,” he said. “It’s happening in the context in which journalists and civil society have either been locked up or kicked out of the country and in which opposition internally is either muzzled or ceases to exist. So it’s a very worrying perspective in terms of medium and long term.”

VOA, BBC ban

At least 1,200 people have lost their lives since Nkrunziza announced his bid for a third term in 2015, and more than 400,000 Burundians have fled the country.

On Friday, Burundi’s National Communications Council announced a six-month ban on broadcasts by Voice of America and the BBC. The Council said the broadcasters have broken the country’s media laws and engaged in “unethical conduct.”

The United States was a strong critic of the president’s decision to seek a third term in 2015, and more recently denounced the alleged acts of violence against opponents of the referendum.

Source: Voice of America

Press Conference by Security Council President on Work Programme for May

Strengthening the principles of international law and the protection of civilians in armed conflict would be two of the major themes that the Security Council would address in the coming month, Joanna Wronecka (Poland), Council President for May, said today as she laid out the organ’s monthly programme of work at a Headquarters press briefing.

Ms. Wronecka said that, on 17 May, President Andrzej Duda of Poland was expected to preside over an open debate on the Security Council’s role in upholding international law, adding that a ministerial-level open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict was scheduled for 22 May. A briefing on the Council’s recent mission to Myanmar and Bangladesh was planned for 14 May, she added.

The Council would also conduct three meetings on the situation in Syria throughout the month, she continued. It would discuss the political and humanitarian situations on 16 May and 29 May, respectively, and address chemical weapons in consultations on 7 May.

Ms. Wronecka said the annual briefing by senior military commanders of three peacekeeping operations was scheduled for 9 May. Force commanders of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) and the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) would all be present.

Also during May, she said, the Council was expected to renew the mandate of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) on 14 May, and that of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) on 29 May, in addition to renewing sanctions on South Sudan.

The Council President said that a number of briefings related to Libya also appeared on the programme, including one by the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court Prosecutor, on 9 May. Discussions on the work of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) and the Libya sanctions regime were slated for 21 May, she added.

Ms. Wronecka went on to say that, on 15 May, the Council would receive its annual briefing by the Chairs of the three counter-terrorism subsidiary bodies: the 1267/1989/2253 Committee, the 1373 Committee and the 1540 Committee.

She said the Council would hold a debate on Bosnia and Herzegovina on 8 May, and hear its quarterly briefing on the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) on 14 May.

A number of other briefings related to United Nations activities in Africa were also planned, she continued. They would include the work of UNMISS and the South Sudan sanctions regime on 8 May, UNAMID on 10 May, United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) on 15 May and the United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS) on 16 May. Later in the month, the Council would hear briefings on the activities of the joint force of the Group of Five for the Sahel on 23 May, and on the political situation in Burundi on 24 May.

The Council President said that additional briefings were scheduled for 28 May, on the situation in Ukraine, and on the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI). The sanctions on Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would be discussed in consultations on 30 May, she added.

Asked what action the Council was expected to take following its recent mission to Bangladesh and Myanmar, during which time members spoke with refugees, high-level political and military authorities, United Nations representatives and members of civil society, Ms. Wronecka said members were united and committed to alleviating the suffering they had witnessed. She went on to say that she expected a presidential statement to be adopted and that discussions on additional steps were ongoing.

Questioned as to whether she anticipated other items to be added to the programme as the month progressed, she recalled that additional items were continuously added to the programme throughout April, noting that the Council had met for 73 hours during that month � a new record. She said the Council was prepared to react to a number of developing situations, including those in the Middle East and the Korean Peninsula.

Source: United Nations

Press Conference by Security Council President on Work Programme for May

Strengthening the principles of international law and the protection of civilians in armed conflict would be two of the major themes that the Security Council would address in the coming month, Joanna Wronecka (Poland), Council President for May, said today as she laid out the organ’s monthly programme of work at a Headquarters press briefing.

Ms. Wronecka said that, on 17 May, President Andrzej Duda of Poland was expected to preside over an open debate on the Security Council’s role in upholding international law, adding that a ministerial-level open debate on the protection of civilians in armed conflict was scheduled for 22 May. A briefing on the Council’s recent mission to Myanmar and Bangladesh was planned for 14 May, she added.

The Council would also conduct three meetings on the situation in Syria throughout the month, she continued. It would discuss the political and humanitarian situations on 16 May and 29 May, respectively, and address chemical weapons in consultations on 7 May.

Ms. Wronecka said the annual briefing by senior military commanders of three peacekeeping operations was scheduled for 9 May. Force commanders of the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA), African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID) and the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) would all be present.

Also during May, she said, the Council was expected to renew the mandate of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) on 14 May, and that of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) on 29 May, in addition to renewing sanctions on South Sudan.

The Council President said that a number of briefings related to Libya also appeared on the programme, including one by the Chief Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court Prosecutor, on 9 May. Discussions on the work of the United Nations Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL) and the Libya sanctions regime were slated for 21 May, she added.

Ms. Wronecka went on to say that, on 15 May, the Council would receive its annual briefing by the Chairs of the three counter-terrorism subsidiary bodies: the 1267/1989/2253 Committee, the 1373 Committee and the 1540 Committee.

She said the Council would hold a debate on Bosnia and Herzegovina on 8 May, and hear its quarterly briefing on the United Nations Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK) on 14 May.

A number of other briefings related to United Nations activities in Africa were also planned, she continued. They would include the work of UNMISS and the South Sudan sanctions regime on 8 May, UNAMID on 10 May, United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) on 15 May and the United Nations Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS) on 16 May. Later in the month, the Council would hear briefings on the activities of the joint force of the Group of Five for the Sahel on 23 May, and on the political situation in Burundi on 24 May.

The Council President said that additional briefings were scheduled for 28 May, on the situation in Ukraine, and on the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI). The sanctions on Democratic People’s Republic of Korea would be discussed in consultations on 30 May, she added.

Asked what action the Council was expected to take following its recent mission to Bangladesh and Myanmar, during which time members spoke with refugees, high-level political and military authorities, United Nations representatives and members of civil society, Ms. Wronecka said members were united and committed to alleviating the suffering they had witnessed. She went on to say that she expected a presidential statement to be adopted and that discussions on additional steps were ongoing.

Questioned as to whether she anticipated other items to be added to the programme as the month progressed, she recalled that additional items were continuously added to the programme throughout April, noting that the Council had met for 73 hours during that month � a new record. She said the Council was prepared to react to a number of developing situations, including those in the Middle East and the Korean Peninsula.

Source: United Nations