Daily Archives: May 1, 2018

Newater Technology, Inc. Announces Year 2017 Audited Financial Results

YANTAI, CHINA / ACCESSWIRE / April 30, 2018 / Newater Technology, Inc. (NASDAQ: NEWA) (”NEWA,” ”we,” ”our” or the ”Company”), a developer, service provider and manufacturer of membrane filtration products and related hardware and engineered systems that are used in the treatment, recycling and discharge of wastewater, today announced its financial results for the year ended December 31, 2017.

The year ended December 31, 2017 Financial Highlights (all comparisons to the year ended December 31, 2016)

  • Revenues increased by 106% from $12.28 million to $25.34 million, which resulted primarily from the increased demand for our projects and services, evidenced by a large increase in our project sales, an increased number of customers and larger scale projects, and service sales.
  • Cost of revenues increased by 121% from $7.74 million to $17.08 million, primarily due to the revenue growth in the same period.
  • Gross profit increased by 82% to $8.26 million in 2017 from $4.54 million in 2016, while the gross profit margin was 33%, compared to 37% for the same period in 2016.
  • Selling, general and administrative expenses (SG&A) increased by 77% from $3.15 million to $5.58 million, however, the percentage of SG&A compared to revenue decreased from 26% to 22%.
  • Operating income increased by 93% from $1.39 million to $2.69 million. Our operating income as a percentage of total revenues was 11% for both 2016 and 2017.
  • Basic earnings per share was $0.26 in 2017 compared to $0.28 in 2016.

Selected Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income Data
in $ million

Year 2017
Year 2016
Change $
change %
Year 2015
Year 2014
Total Revenues
25.34 12.28 13.06 106 % 6.98 1.03
Total Cost of Revenues
17.08 7.74 9.34 121 % 3.76 0.67
Gross profit
8.26 4.54 3.72 82 % 3.21 0.36
Gross profit margin
33 % 37 % 46 % 35 %
SG&A
5.58 3.15 2.43 77 % 1.64 0.36
SG&A %
22 % 26 % 24 % 35 %
Operating income
2.69 1.39 1.29 93 % 1.57 0.00
Operation margin
11 % 11 % 23 % 0 %
Other Expenses (Income)
(0.38) (1.59) 1.21 0.17
Income before tax
3.07 2.98 0.08 3 % 1.40 0
Income tax provision
0.48 0.55 0.45 0.00
Net income
2.59 2.43 0.16 6 % 0.95 (0.00)
Basic Earnings Per share
$ 0.26 $ 0.28 0.12
Basic Weighted average number of common shares outstanding
9,864,479 8,767,738 8,200,000 8,200,000

Mr. Yuebiao Li, the Company’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, commented ”2017 was an important and pivotal year for NEWA. Our company successfully completed its initial public offering and our common shares were listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market. We continued to have robust growth in our revenues and achieved strong operating results. We are excited about 2018, as our membrane technology was successfully selected as one of the advanced technologies to be promoted in China in 2018 by China’s Ministry of Water Resources in its proclamation ”2018 Guide to Promote Advanced Practical Technology.” In addition, Phase I of our new manufacturing complex in Yantai, China, is expected to be completed as scheduled. With our new manufacturing facilities, we expect to increase our production capacity significantly, making it possible to meet the increasing expected demand for our products. In addition, we believe our unwavering commitment to R&D will position NEWA for a long-term growth.”

About Newater Technology, Inc.

Founded in 2012 and headquartered in Yantai, China, Newater, operating its business through its wholly owned subsidiary Jinzheng, specializes in the development, manufacture and sale of DTRO (Disk Tube Reverse Osmosis) and DTNF (Disk Tube Nano-Filtration) membranes for waste water treatment, recycling and discharge. Newater provides integrated technical solutions in engineering support and installation, technical advice and water purification services, and other project-related solutions to turn wastewater into valuable clean water.

The Company’s products can be used across a wide spectrum of industries, including:

– Leachate from landfills
– Wastewater from oil fields
– High acid wastewater
– Power plant waste water
– Wastewater from gas production
– Desalination

More information about the Company can be found at: www.newater.cc.

Notice

Rounding amounts and percentages: Certain amounts and percentages included in this press release have been rounded for ease of presentation. Percentage figures included in this press release have not in all cases been calculated on the basis of such rounded figures, but on the basis of such amounts prior to rounding. For this reason, certain percentage amounts in this press release may vary from those obtained by performing the same calculations using the figures in the financial statements. In addition, certain other amounts that appear in this press release may not sum due to rounding.

Forward-Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements as defined by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements include statements concerning plans, objectives, goals, strategies, future events or performance, and underlying assumptions and other statements that are other than statements of historical facts. When the Company uses words such as ”may,” ”will,” ”intend,” ”should,” ”believe,” ”expect,” ”anticipate,” ”project,” ”estimate” or similar expressions that do not relate solely to historical matters, it is making forward-looking statements. Specifically, the Company’s statements regarding: 1) its continued growth and business outlook, 2) completion of its manufacturing facility on schedule; and 3) abiltiy to increase its production capacity to meet the anticipated demand for its products are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties that may cause the actual results to differ materially from the Company’s expectations discussed in the forward-looking statements. These statements are subject to uncertainties and risks including, but not limited to, the following: the Company’s goals and strategies; the Company’s future business development; product and service demand and acceptance; changes in technology; economic conditions; the growth of the water filtration industry in China; reputation and brand; the impact of competition and pricing; government regulations; fluctuations in general economic and business conditions in China and assumptions underlying or related to any of the foregoing and other risks contained in reports filed by the Company with the Securities and Exchange Commission. For these reasons, among others, investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance upon any forward-looking statements in this press release. Additional factors are discussed in the Company’s filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which are available for review at www.sec.gov. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly revise these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that arise after the date hereof.

For more information, please contact:

Company

Zhuo Zhang CFO
NEWATER TECHNOLOGY INC.
Phone: +86 (535) 626-4177
Email: zhuozhang@newater.cc

Investor Relations

Y. Tracy Tang CFA, CPA
SINO-AMERICAN INVESTOR ADVISORY
Phone: +1 (646) 485-1040
Email: Tracy.tang@sino-UsInvestors.com

NEWATER TECHNOLOGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

December 31,
December 31,
2017
2016
ASSETS
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
$
3,118,080
$
1,484,762
Restricted cash, current
6,753,685
1,439,926
Accounts receivable, net
6,050,495
2,637,236
Accounts receivable from related party, net
1,060,977
Notes receivable
68,108
Inventories
10,279,397
4,840,234
Deferred cost of revenue
2,547,580
Advances to suppliers and other current assets, net
2,885,510
2,528,411
Due from related parties
3,563
Total current assets
31,634,747
14,063,217
Restricted cash, non-current
500,000
Property, plant and equipment, net
10,449,466
1,199,611
Land use rights, net
2,243,183
2,143,002
Deferred tax assets
518,251
181,003
Other non-current assets
4,591
Total assets
$
45,345,647
$
17,591,424
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY
Current liabilities
Accounts payable and bank acceptance notes to vendors
$
4,903,058
$
1,844,077
Loans due within one year
9,020,697
2,879,853
Due to related parties
714,999
Deferred income
25,919
Advances from customers
1,408,208
833,742
Income tax payables
501,921
329,212
Accrued expenses and other payables
8,509,425
210,400
Total current liabilities
24,343,309
6,838,202
Long term loans
11,050
Total liabilities
24,354,359
6,838,202
Shareholders’ equity
Common shares ($0.001 par value, 200,000,000 shares authorized, 10,809,000 and 9,199,000 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively)
10,809
9,199
Additional paid-in capital
15,059,181
7,949,466
Statutory reserves
705,698
382,802
Retained earnings
5,228,733
2,960,698
Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(13,133)
(548,943)
Total shareholders’ equity
20,991,288
10,753,222
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity
$
45,345,647
$
17,591,424

NEWATER TECHNOLOGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

For the Years Ended December 31,
2017
2016
2015
Net revenues
$
25,339,497
$
11,985,055
$
3,318,833
Net revenues from related parties
294,666
3,659,421
Total revenues
25,339,497
12,279,721
6,978,254
Cost of revenues
17,077,129
7,182,081
778,903
Cost of revenues from related party
556,692
2,984,968
Total cost of revenues
17,077,129
7,738,773
3,763,871
Gross profit
8,262,368
4,540,948
3,214,383
Operating expenses:
Selling, general and administrative
5,575,086
3,146,521
1,643,313
Total operating expenses
5,575,086
3,146,521
1,643,313
Income from operations
2,687,282
1,394,427
1,571,070
Interest expense
242,707
155,553
164,613
Interest income
(112,592)
(5,091)
(2,612)
Government grants
(513,538)
(1,750,726)
Other expenses
3,956
12,534
10,642
Total other expense (income)
(379,467)
(1,587,730)
172,643
Income before income tax provisions
3,066,749
2,982,157
1,398,427
Income tax provisions
475,818
548,437
452,850
Net income
$
2,590,931
$
2,433,720
$
945,577
Other comprehensive income (loss)
Foreign currency translation adjustment
535,810
(383,947)
(166,349)
Total comprehensive income
$
3,126,741
$
2,049,773
$
779,228
Earnings per common share
Basic
$
0.26
$
0.28
$
0.12
Diluted
$
0.26
$
0.28
$
0.10
Weighted average number of common shares outstanding
Basic
9,864,479
8,767,738
8,200,000
Diluted
9,864,479
8,767,738
9,160,087

NEWATER TECHNOLOGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Number of Shares
Common Shares
Additional Paid-in Capital
Retained Earnings (Deficit)
Statutory Reserves
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
Total Shareholders’ Equity
Balance, January 1, 2015
8,200,000
$
8,200
$
787,151
$
(35,797)
$
$
1,353
$
760,907
Net income
945,577
945,577
Capital contribution from owners
2,212,796
2,212,796
Statutory reserves
(92,995)
92,995
Foreign currency translation adjustment
(166,349)
(166,349)
Balance, December 31, 2015
8,200,000
8,200
2,999,947
816,785
92,995
(164,996)
3,752,931
Net income
2,433,720
2,433,720
Capital contribution from owners
198,917
198,917
Statutory reserves
(289,807)
289,807
Issuance of common shares for debt conversion
999,000
999
3,846,001
3,847,000
Issuance of common shares for cash
5,323,026
5,323,026
Capital distribution in connection with acquisition of a subsidiary
(4,418,425)
(4,418,425)
Foreign currency translation adjustment
(383,947)
(383,947)
Balance, December 31, 2016
9,199,000
9,199
7,949,466
2,960,698
382,802
(548,943)
10,753,222
Net income
2,590,931
2,590,931
Statutory reserves
(322,896)
322,896
Issuance of common shares for cash
1,610,000
1,610
7,109,715
7,111,325
Foreign currency translation adjustment
535,810
535,810
Balance, December 31, 2017
10,809,000
$
10,809
$
15,059,181
$
5,228,733
$
705,698
$
(13,133)
$
20,991,288

NEWATER TECHNOLOGY, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

For the Years Ended December 31,
2017
2016
2015
Cash flows from operating activities
Net income
$
2,590,931
$
2,433,720
$
945,577
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash used in operating activities:
Depreciation and amortization expense
233,493
187,662
86,396
Bad debt expense
229,707
76,459
39,173
Deferred income taxes
(312,997)
(82,162)
(106,401)
Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment
6,199
Gain on disposal of subsidiary
(789)
Changes in assets and liabilities:
Accounts receivable
(3,345,269)
(1,410,115)
(1,411,777)
Accounts receivable from related parties
1,090,465
3,645,922
(3,754,977)
Notes receivable
70,000
(56,139)
64,218
Inventories
(4,923,400)
(2,743,853)
(1,890,918)
Deferred cost of revenue
(2,453,097)
Advances to suppliers and other current assets
(412,955)
(2,289,933)
(540,737)
Advances to supplier – related party
793,106
Due from related parties
703
75,469
(1,023)
Other non-current assets
4,719
22,857
132,971
Accounts payable and bank acceptance notes to vendors
2,825,887
1,079,258
582,555
Accounts payable to related party
(2,140,504)
1,159,416
Deferred income
(26,639)
(30,102)
61,007
Advances from customers
499,067
425,736
(42,227)
Due to related parties
5,102
(28,257)
(68,302)
Income tax payables
144,944
(181,386)
550,163
Accrued expenses and other payables
589,638
352,502
437,151
Net cash used in operating activities
(3,189,701)
(663,655)
(2,958,430)
Cash flows from investing activities
Purchase of land use rights
(2,261,745)
Purchase of property, plant and equipment
(1,482,360)
(66,641)
(1,218,404)
Proceeds from disposal of property, plant and equipment
9,296
Advances to third parties
(1,236,490)
(301,019)
(40,136)
Repayments from third parties
1,236,490
338,646
Advances to related parties
(239,467)
(353,767)
Repayments from related parties
2,960
473,320
20,871
Net change in restricted cash
(5,712,407)
(922,380)
(621,567)
Cash received in connection with disposal of subsidiary
(1,209)
Net cash used in investing activities
(7,191,807)
(2,980,495)
(2,203,707)
Cash flows from financing activities
Proceeds from issuances of common shares
7,111,325
5,323,026
Capital contribution from shareholders
198,917
2,212,796
Capital distribution in connection with acquisition of a subsidiary
(4,418,4250)
Borrowings from related parties
2,558,661
478,969
Repayment to related parties
(739,973)
(1,982,733)
(799,590)
Proceeds from loans due within one year
8,805,683
11,613,289
4,013,614
Repayment of loans
(3,283,830)
(8,142,563)
(642,178)
Net cash provided by financing activities
11,893,205
5,150,172
5,263,611
Effect of foreign exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
121,621
(156,412)
(3,080)
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
1,633,318
1,349,610
98,394
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of the year
1,484,762
135,152
36,758
Cash and cash equivalents, end of the year
$
3,118,080
$
1,484,762
$
135,152
Supplemental cash flow information
Cash paid for interest
$
244,753
$
307,797
$
8,354
Cash paid for income taxes
$
656,602
$
812,637
$
9,088
Non-cash investing and financing activities:
Stock issued for debt conversion
$
$
3,847,000
$
Properties acquired with loans
$
206,000
$
$
Liabilities assumed in connection with purchase of property, plant and equipment
$
7,445,478
$
$

SOURCE: Newater Technology, Inc.

Malawi Pushes New Biometric Voter Registration, Despite Doubts

Malawi has always relied on paper registration for voters, but electoral authorities say that hasn’t worked so well.

“We used to have a lot of problems in the past” with the passports and driver’s licenses used for registration “because photographs may fall off” or names may get misspelled, said Yahya Mmadi, a member of the Malawi Electoral Commission.

But the southeast African country’s recently unveiled biometric system, being put in place before the 2019 general elections, “will be 100 percent correct,” he said. It relies on unique markers such as fingerprints.

The new system has another advantage, according to Mmadi: It is faster, so people will spend less time on registration than when passports and driver’s licenses had to be verified and checked.

The commission wants to see the national ID card which uses biometric data and is issued by the National Registration Bureau (NRB) as the only acceptable document for voter registration.

There’s one problem: Only about 9 million of 16 million Malawians have registered for the national ID card.

Plan of action

Mmadi said the electoral commission is working on that.

“What is going to happen is that we will go out with members of NRB to the registration centers,” he said. “Those without registration cards will actually be advised to go and get registered with the NRB.”

Some voting rights groups are concerned about the change. Steve Duwa, chairman of the Malawi National Electoral Support Network, said he expected a legal challenge to the new system.

“The law, as it stands now, allows different forms of identification apart from the national ID,” Duwa said. The electoral commission promotes biometric voter registration “as easier to implement and therefore would love as much as possible for the prospective voters to only use the national ID. But the question is: What will happen to the law?”

The commission already has asked the Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Affairs to amend the law so that the national ID will be the only document used to identify eligible voters.

Malawi is expected to start the voter registration campaign next month.

Source: Voice of America

Female Cabbies Hit Nairobi’s Roads as Taxi-Hailing Apps Mushroom

With their manicured nails, immaculate makeup and matching handbags and

stilettos, you would be forgiven for mistaking the five women seated in the cafe of the upscale Nairobi hotel for a group of senior female executives.

Sipping white hot chocolate from delicate porcelain cups, they discuss their long working hours and challenges in finding time with their children, and share strategies on networking and dealing with difficult clients.

But these Kenyan women aren’t company directors, finance professionals or corporate lawyers they are part of a new breed of women who are breaking into the male-dominated taxi sector and hitting Nairobi’s roads as e-cabbies.

“Taxi driving is not something I would have considered before, but after driving for a taxi app service, I think it’s a really good job for women,” said Lydia Muchiri, 29, in a knee-length fitted white dress with floral print.

“It’s convenient, easy and safe much better than sitting at home and depending on handouts,” she said, as the other women, in their 20s and 30s, nodded in agreement.

As taxi-hailing apps mushroom to fill a hole in Nairobi’s poor public transport system, rising numbers of women are taking up jobs as drivers citing benefits such as flexible working hours, the ability to select passengers, and guaranteed payment.

Online female cabbies currently make up only about 3 percent of the city’s estimated 12,000 e-taxi drivers, but industry officials say their numbers are growing exponentially.

Little Cabs, one of Nairobi’s popular ride-sharing platforms, and the only app offering riders the choice of a male or female driver, has witnessed a 13-fold increase in the number of female drivers over the last two years.

“There were 27 women drivers registered with Little Cabs when we first started in June 2016, now there are 381. We aim to have 1,000 women drivers by the end of this year,” said Jefferson Aluda, operations manager for Little Cabs.

“Many people think taxi driving is a man’s job, but that view is changing. Customers tell us that women are careful drivers and very professional. Through our recruitment campaigns, we expect more women to join.”

Empowering

Kenya’s economy has grown on average by 5 percent annually over the last decade, but the benefits have not been equally distributed and women remain disadvantaged socially, economically and politically.

Women make up only a third of the 2.5 million people employed in the formal sector and own only 1 percent of agricultural land, according to the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS).

Despite global criticism that the sharing economy lowers wages, encourages tax evasion and provides little protections to users, the emergence of platforms such as taxi-hailing apps in Kenya is in fact helping to empower women.

In the last three years, at least a dozen e-cab apps have launched to meet the demands of a growing smartphone-armed middle class seeking an affordable and safer alternative to the city’s reckless overcrowded matatus, or minivans.

Drivers earn a minimum of 30 Kenyan shillings ($0.30) per minute and companies take up to 25 percent their earnings, but female drivers still welcome the opportunity provided by firms such as Uber, Taxify, Little Cabs and Pewin.

Minus the company fee, fuel and car rental costs, drivers working 12 hours daily can earn on average 60,000 shillings ($600) in a month, say industry sources.

Faridah Khamis, a single mother of five children, decided to become an online taxi driver in February last year after chatting with a male driver who encouraged her to apply.

“The rates are low and I have to work 12 hours daily when my children are at school and at night when they are asleep. But it’s better money than an office job these days,” said the 36-year-old woman standing beside her silver Mazda.

“I also think it’s very safe for women. I choose when I work, where I work, and which clients I work with. If I was a regular taxi driver, I would be on the roads looking for passengers. The app means I can find customers from my home.”

The women choose riders with higher ratings and opt for locations in populated rather than isolated areas. Their companies also track them via GPS, and they have an alert/SOS button on their apps for support if they need help.

Not always a smooth ride

Uber officials say ride-sharing apps can provide a great economic opportunity for women, particularly in developing nations such as Kenya.

“We think apps like Uber can help break down global, structural barriers that keep women from fully participating in the economy,” Uber’s East Africa spokeswoman Janet Kemboi told the Thomson Foundation.

“These include social biases, security risks, financial and digital inclusion, and access to vehicles and other assets.”

But it’s not always a smooth ride for Kenya’s female e-cabbies. They occasionally face discrimination and abuse from difficulties renting cars due to biased perceptions that women are bad drivers, to fending off drunken male passengers.

And with their phone numbers accessible to customers through the app, the women also endure daily “follow-up calls” from former customers who want to date them after the trip is over.

The female cabbies say they also face sexist comments where people perceive them to be sex workers simply because they are well-dressed, working at night, and doing a “man’s job.”

But such instances are rare, say the female drivers, and working in the taxi sector has inspired some of them to one day have their own fleet of taxis for women, driven by women.

“There is a demand for women taxi drivers. Customers appreciate our appearance and professionalism. Some say we drive safer and our cars are cleaner than [those of] male drivers,” said Muchiri.

“We take pride in ourselves and in our job. We are no less than someone who works in an office. We see our car as our office and believe that once we are in the car, we must behave like a professional.”

Source: Voice of America

Deputy Secretary Sullivan’s Meeting With Nigerian Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Heather Nauert:

Deputy Secretary John Sullivan met with Nigerian Foreign Minister Geoffrey Onyeama on April 30, as part of the official working visit of President Muhammadu Buhari to Washington, DC.

The Deputy Secretary recognized Nigeria’s leadership on our shared priorities of improving security, creating economic opportunity, and advancing democracy and stability across Africa. He offered continued support to the Nigerian government and civil society as they work to prevent and mitigate conflict. The Deputy Secretary and Foreign Minister Onyeama also discussed opportunities to enhance bilateral trade and investment.

Source: U.S. State Department

IAEA Helps African Countries in the Production and Use of Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer and Other Diseases

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started a four-year project to help 17 African countries produce and apply vital radiopharmaceuticals for treating and managing cancer and other common diseases.

The new project builds on a previous IAEA effort to train nuclear medicine professionals, pharmacists and technicians in the safe preparation and administration of these medical drugs. It will step up education activities to create a certification process for radiopharmacists, and provide expert advice to countries in upgrading nuclear medicine facilities to handle radiopharmaceuticals.

Many African countries offer nuclear medicine services but have limited radiopharmacy capacities, said Shaukat Abdulrazak, Director of the Division for Africa in the IAEA’s Technical Cooperation Department. The IAEA has previously helped the continent through equipment and more than 20 fellowships and Master of Sciences degrees in this field, but there is a need to expand these efforts with long-term educational opportunities in Africa.

Representatives from the participating countries � Algeria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mauritius, Morocco, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Tunisia, Uganda and Zambia � met this week with IAEA experts in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss the implementation of the project.

Radiopharmaceuticals are medicines that contain small amounts of radioactive isotopes. They need to be produced under carefully controlled conditions and tested for quality before being given to patients. Their production requires the handling of radioactive substances, which increases the need for more stringent controls, said Amirreza Jalilian, a chemist at the Division of Physical and Chemical Sciences of the IAEA’s Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications.

The medical drugs can be used either for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. The vast majority � 85 per cent � are used for medical imaging, providing doctors with a better internal picture of a patient’s condition.

Originally developed to diagnose and treat cancer, radiopharmaceuticals have evolved to become indispensable in the management of heart, kidney and bone diseases, as well as brain disorders such as Alzheimer’s, dementia and Parkinson’s.

Technetium-99m (Tc-99m) is the most widely used radioisotope for medical diagnosis. It has a short half-life, so it needs to be extracted from its parent radioisotope Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) locally and given to a patient within hours. While large-scale production of Mo-99 can only be done in specialized facilities and is limited to a handful of countries, the extraction of Tc-99m at hospitals and nuclear medicine centres is straight forward. The radioisotope is extracted from Mo-99 using a generator the size of a coffee-machine, mixed in a vial with the appropriate molecule, given to a patient and traced using a relatively inexpensive gamma camera.

The field, however, evolves rapidly, and more advanced diagnostic techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) are becoming commonplace. These radiopharmaceuticals are not only more complicated to prepare, but the quality control tests are also very different, said Jalilian. There is a higher dose involved, and the nature of radiation is different and can also damage healthy parts of the body if prepared incorrectly.

Several African countries plan to expand or upgrade their nuclear medicine- and radiopharmacy facilities, including for the future production of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The project aims to prepare countries for such expansion and to develop a new generation of qualified professionals that can produce and dispense doses according to appropriate standards.

Morocco, which has developed a radiopharmaceutical post-graduate programme with IAEA support, is looking to establish a Master’s Programme to train professionals from the region. Radiopharmaceuticals are an essential part of medical procedures, said Naoual Bentaleb, radiopharmacist at Morocco’s CNESTEN. We want to support and provide technical expertise to ensure their regular production and availability in Africa.

The IAEA assists countries to improve nuclear medicine services through training and equipment, and provides advice on quality assurance systems for their safe use.

Source: International Atomic Energy Agency