Daily Archives: April 23, 2018

SOUTH AFRICAN PARLIAMENT WANTS SOCCER LEAGUE SUMMONED TO EXPLAIN WEEKEND MATCH VIOLENCE

CAPE TOWN– The Chairperson of the South African Parliament’s portfolio committee on sports, Beauty Dlulane, has expressed shock at the crowd violence at Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban on Saturday night in which 18 people were injured in a rampage by a group of Kaizer Chiefs fans after their team lost 2-0 in the Nedbank Champions semi-finals against Free State Stars.

A security officer was among those injured after fans who moved onto the pitch assaulted him, leaving him unconscious.

Dlulane said Sunday that the incident justified the need to revisit the question of safety at soccer stadia in the country.

I couldn’t believe it when we were seeing the hooligans. How did they get to the pitch and where were the security and the stadium management? And to my surprise, we are still waiting for the report of the other stampede where we lost lives.” said Dlulane.

“With this one we don’t know whether we are going to lose lives of those who are severely injured. Could you believe when you are looking in those pictures, seeing a woman that was kicked and beaten by chairs? How can the people of South Africa be like this?

Opposition Democratic Alliance (DA) Member of Parliament Tsepo Mhlongo, the party’s spokesperson for sports, wants Parliament to call the Premier Soccer League, the national sports association which runs the Premier Division institution, to account for the violence.

Mhlongo said the incident was unacceptable and the DA wants the Parliamentary Committee on Sports to call the PSL to appear before it soon.

The Chairperson of the Premier Soccer League Irvin Khoza will address the media on Monday on the matter. Police arrested two people following the violence. The extent of damage is still being assessed. Police spokesperson Nqobile Gwala says more arrests are imminent while the suspects arrested will appear in court on Monday.

Two suspects were arrested for public violence as well as malicious damage to property and they will appear in the Durban Magistrate’s Court, she said.

Chiefs Coach Steve Komphela announced his resignation after the defeat.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

TRADE CONFLICTS BENEFIT NO ONE, SAYS CHAIR OF IMF STEERING COMMITTEE

Trade conflicts benefit no one, as there are no winners. That was the message from the Chairperson of the International Monetary and Financial Committee (IMFC), the top policy steering committee of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Lesetja Kganyago, who was addressing the media at the conclusion of their deliberations in Washington Sunday.

The United States has been calling out what it terms unfair global trade practices which US and global growth, but the IMFC stresses that increasing trade is critical to broad-based economic growth. The question of land expropriation without compensation was also put to Kganyago, who is the governor of the South African Reserve Bank (SARB).

South Africa has proposed to expropriate land without compensation to redress what it describes as historical injustices when the land of the indigenous people were seized from them by the white European settlers.

It was Kganyago’s first stint as head of the IMFC and he gave an uncompromising message despite pressure from the largest economy in the world. The bottom line here is that trade tensions are not to the benefit of anyone. There can never if there is a trade conflict there could never be winners,” he said.

“We could all only be losers, and it is within that context that it is important that, as a global community, we keep trade open, we ensure that we work within the multilateral system that we have to make sure that if there are disputes, that those disputes are resolved and I think that is for me what is going to be crucial.

Asked if an African proverb about elephants fighting while trampling the grass below might have helped in explaining the ramifications of a trade war to US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, Kganyago answered: I don’t know what Mr Mnuchin had said, the communique that we have, that we have released to the extent that it talks about trade, it had been signed off by the entire membership.

“So, when we say that there are rising trade tensions, it is the collective assessment of the committee. African proverbs are always very nice, but it will be very difficult to explain an African proverb from here.

South Africa is among the most unequal societies anywhere in the world, and part of addressing that inequity, the country is engaged in the possibility of land expropriation without compensation.

I would simply say that we have mentioned many times over the respect for the rule of law, and I would suspect that South Africa is being a very civilized, sophisticated country when it comes to the law; the rule of law will also be binding on all � and I would just maybe use a proverb. I have no idea whether it’s an African proverb or not, but my recollection is it goes something like ‘Trust grows at the speed of a coconut tree, and falls at the speed of a coconut’, said IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde.

The IMFC is comprised of 24 member states drawn from a pool of 189 IMF Governors and its meeting here at the weekend was held during the annual Spring meetings here of the IMF and ther World Bank. The autumn meetings of the IMF and World Bank will take place in Bali, Indonesia, in October.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

TRADE CONFLICTS BENEFIT NO ONE, SAYS CHAIR OF IMF STEERING COMMITTEE

Trade conflicts benefit no one, as there are no winners. That was the message from the Chairperson of the International Monetary and Financial Committee (IMFC), the top policy steering committee of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), Lesetja Kganyago, who was addressing the media at the conclusion of their deliberations in Washington Sunday.

The United States has been calling out what it terms unfair global trade practices which US and global growth, but the IMFC stresses that increasing trade is critical to broad-based economic growth. The question of land expropriation without compensation was also put to Kganyago, who is the governor of the South African Reserve Bank (SARB).

South Africa has proposed to expropriate land without compensation to redress what it describes as historical injustices when the land of the indigenous people were seized from them by the white European settlers.

It was Kganyago’s first stint as head of the IMFC and he gave an uncompromising message despite pressure from the largest economy in the world. The bottom line here is that trade tensions are not to the benefit of anyone. There can never if there is a trade conflict there could never be winners,” he said.

“We could all only be losers, and it is within that context that it is important that, as a global community, we keep trade open, we ensure that we work within the multilateral system that we have to make sure that if there are disputes, that those disputes are resolved and I think that is for me what is going to be crucial.

Asked if an African proverb about elephants fighting while trampling the grass below might have helped in explaining the ramifications of a trade war to US Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, Kganyago answered: I don’t know what Mr Mnuchin had said, the communique that we have, that we have released to the extent that it talks about trade, it had been signed off by the entire membership.

“So, when we say that there are rising trade tensions, it is the collective assessment of the committee. African proverbs are always very nice, but it will be very difficult to explain an African proverb from here.

South Africa is among the most unequal societies anywhere in the world, and part of addressing that inequity, the country is engaged in the possibility of land expropriation without compensation.

I would simply say that we have mentioned many times over the respect for the rule of law, and I would suspect that South Africa is being a very civilized, sophisticated country when it comes to the law; the rule of law will also be binding on all � and I would just maybe use a proverb. I have no idea whether it’s an African proverb or not, but my recollection is it goes something like ‘Trust grows at the speed of a coconut tree, and falls at the speed of a coconut’, said IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde.

The IMFC is comprised of 24 member states drawn from a pool of 189 IMF Governors and its meeting here at the weekend was held during the annual Spring meetings here of the IMF and ther World Bank. The autumn meetings of the IMF and World Bank will take place in Bali, Indonesia, in October.

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK

Madagascar Leader Urges End to Unrest Amid Protests Over Deaths

Madagascar’s president on Monday demanded an end to unrest he said was intended to divide the country after two demonstrators were killed in a confrontation between police and anti-government protesters at the weekend.

The violence has inflamed a political dispute over new electoral laws, and President Hery Rajaonarimampianina’s remarks coincided with a march through the capital by thousands of anti-government demonstrators protesting against the deaths.

“As army chief, the president has not shed blood and will not shed blood,” said Rajaonarimampianina, referring to himself in the third person in remarks on a visit to port project. “The blood has flowed enough in our country. It must stop. The violence must stop.”

His remarks appeared to signal a change of tone from Sunday, when he described the protests as “a coup” and warned “those who sow unrest and incite people to tear each other apart” that the state would respond by assuming its responsibilities.

On Saturday, police fired teargas at an opposition demonstration held in protest against new electoral laws, where one person died and more than a dozen were treated for injuries, some caused by teargas canisters.

Another individual injured in Saturday’s unrest, died on Sunday, Olivat Alson Rakoto, director of a hospital in the city, told Reuters.

On Monday, thousands of demonstrators, most of them dressed in white, assembled in front of the city hall and a public square, where the coffins of the two individuals killed at the weekend were placed on the ground, the Reuters witness said.

Supporters of opposition politician Marc Ravalomanana, a former leader of the Indian Ocean island nation, say the new electoral laws are designed to block him from running in the election. The opposition is also challenging provisions on campaign financing and access to media in the laws.

“We protest these laws that were adopted by corrupted members of parliament,” said Christine Razanamahasoa, an opposition lawmaker.

Dialogue

Harivonjy Randriamalala, a 42-year-old father of three children, said: “We want the president to resign. We want freedom of speech. We want elections in which all people can run.”

Ravalomanana, who was removed in a 2009 coup, has teamed up with the man who succeeded him, Andy Rajoelina, to oppose the laws pushed by President Hery Rajaonarimampianina.

The election is due before the end of this year though the precise date has yet to be set.

“I call on churches to convince those who are not yet convinced to engage in dialogue to find a solution to the crisis. If not, we can no longer contain (the anger of) the people,” Ravalomanana said in a statement.

Before Monday’s march began, General Beni Xavier Rasolofonirina, the defense minister, appealed to politicians to find an outcome that would avoid violence.

“The security forces invite politicians to discuss and find a political solution to a political problem. The police will never accept power that does not come from the electoral process,” he said in a statement.

He said police would stay away from the area where people were marching.

Source: Voice of America

Report: Egypt’s Sinai Battle Keeps Food, Supplies From Thousands

An Egyptian military campaign to defeat Islamic State militants in the northern Sinai Peninsula is choking essential food and medical supplies to thousands of residents in the remote desert region, a report by Human Rights Watch said on Monday.

The New York-based group warned of a wider humanitarian crisis if North Sinai continued to be cut off from the Egyptian mainland, saying army’s actions border on collective punishment.

The army launched a wide operation in February to crush jihadists who have waged a years-long insurgency that has killed hundreds of soldiers, police and residents. Airstrikes and raids have killed scores of suspected militants since then, the military says, as it imposes curfews and tight movement restrictions around towns in North Sinai.

Response in the works

The military said it was preparing a response to the HRW report. It has distributed food to Sinai residents during the highly-publicized campaign and says it is winning the battle against jihadists. International news outlets are prevented from traveling to North Sinai to report.

Residents said food supplies, medicine and fuel were insufficient and that movement restrictions meant most people were unable to leave the region, HRW reported.

A counter-terrorism operation that imperils the flow of essential goods to hundreds of thousands of civilians is unlawful and unlikely to stem violence, HRW’s Middle East and North Africa director Sarah Leah Whitson said.

The report said authorities had banned the sale of petrol and cut communication lines, water and electricity in some areas of North Sinai including near the border with the Gaza Strip.

Residents told Reuters last month they often waited for hours for bread handouts which were not guaranteed to arrive.

President Sisi draws mixed reviews

Defeating Islamists and restoring security after years of unrest that followed Egypt’s 2011 popular uprising has been a promise of President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who was re-elected in March in a landslide victory against no real opposition.

Sisi’s critics say he has presided over Egypt’s worst crackdown on dissent. Supporters say such measures are needed to bring stability and improve the country’s hard-hit economy.

In Sinai, analysts and foreign diplomats say heavy-handed military tactics including airstrikes and demolitions of populated areas have failed to beat the Islamist insurgency.

Source: Voice of America