Daily Archives: February 22, 2018

Precision Aviation Group (PAG) and Honeywell Aerospace sign agreement

ATLANTA, Feb. 22, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Precision Aviation Group, Inc. (PAG), a leading provider of products and value-added services to the worldwide aerospace and defense industry, is pleased to announce the signing of a dealership agreement with Honeywell Aerospace which allows PAG to sell, exchange and provide MRO services on Honeywell avionics products including Aspire (satcom) and SkyConnect.

“The agreement with Honeywell demonstrates our continuing commitment and dedication to meeting our customers’ needs by expanding the products and services we offer,” said Ketan Desai, vice president of sales and marketing for PAG. “Expanding our product offering to include Honeywell’s Aspire 200 satcom and SkyConnect is a natural extension of the products and services we currently provide through all 8 of our worldwide locations,” adds Desai.

Honeywell received its first helicopter platform supplemental type certificate (STC) for its Aspire 200 satcom system in 2015, and over the past 24 months has completed certification on a range of helicopters across all segments of the market, including the Leonardo AW139, the Airbus AS350, the Bell 429, the Sikorsky UH-60/S-70 family, and a fleet of Mil Mi-8s in Europe.

Our relationship with Honeywell is a valuable one not only to us but all the customers we support worldwide,” said David Mast, President & CEO of PAG. “Our two companies have had a long-standing and successful service agreement in North America. With this latest announcement operators PAG supports will be able to benefit from ‘just-in-time’, local support for a wider range of products and services including Honeywell avionics products.”

PAG will be exhibiting at Heli-Expo (PHP Booth# C2851), please stop by to learn more about the Honeywell’s Aspire 200 and SkyConnect systems.

Precision Aviation Group, Inc. Logo (PRNewsFoto/Precision Aviation Group)

About Precision Aviation Group:
Precision Aviation Group (PAG) is a leading provider of products and value-added services to the worldwide aerospace and defense industry. With nine locations and more than 260,000-square-feet of sales and service facilities in the United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil, and Singapore, PAG uses its distinct business units and customer-focused business model to serve aviation customers through two business functions – Aviation Supply Chain, and its trademarked Inventory Supported Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (ISMRO®) services.
PAG provides MRO and Supply Chain Solutions for Fixed- and Rotary-wing aircraft through: Precision Heliparts – PHP (www.heliparts.com); Precision Aircraft Services – PAS (www.pas-pag.com); Precision Accessories & Instruments – PAI (www.precisionaccessories.com); Precision Heliparts Canada – PHP-C (www.heliparts.ca); Precision Accessories & Instruments Canada – PAI-C (www.precisionaccessories.ca); PHP-Instruments & Accessories – PHP-LA (www.heliparts.la); Precision Heliparts – Latin America (www.precisionaviationgroup.com/php-br); Precision Aero Technology – PAT (www.precisionaerotechnology.com); Precision Heliparts – Australia – PHP-AU (www.precisionheliparts.com.au); Precision Accessories & Instruments – Australia (PAI-AU) (www.precisionaccessories.com.au); Precision Heliparts Singapore (PHP-S); and Precision Aviation Controls, Inc. – PAC (www.precisionaviationcontrols.com). PAG subsidiaries have MRO capabilities on over 35,000 products, including accessories, avionics, engine components, hydraulics, instruments, NDT, starter/generators, and wheels/brakes (www.precisionaviationgroup.com).        

Logo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/338527/precision_aviation_group_inc_logo.jpg

Primitive Art: Neanderthals Were Europe’s First Painters

The world’s oldest known cave paintings were made by Neanderthals, not modern humans, suggesting our extinct cousins were far from being uncultured brutes.

A high-tech analysis of cave art at three Spanish sites, published on Thursday, dates the paintings to at least 64,800 years ago, or 20,000 years before modern humans arrived in Europe from Africa.

That makes the cave art much older than previously thought and provides the strongest evidence yet that Neanderthals had the cognitive capacity to understand symbolic representation, a central pillar of human culture.

“What we’ve got here is a smoking gun that really overturns the notion that Neanderthals were knuckle-dragging cavemen,” said Alistair Pike, professor of archaeological sciences at the University of Southampton, who co-led the study.

“Painting is something that has always been seen as a very human activity, so if Neanderthals are doing it they are being just like us,” he told reporter.

While some archaeologists already viewed Neanderthals as more sophisticated than their commonplace caricature, the evidence until now has been inconclusive. With the data from the three Spanish cave sites described in the journal Science, Pike and colleagues believe they finally have rock-solid proof.

The early cave art at La Pasiega, Maltravieso and Ardales includes lines, dots, discs and hand stencils and creating them would have involved specific skills, such as mixing pigments and selecting appropriate display locations.

The Neanderthals living in the same land that would one day give birth to Diego Velazquez and Pablo Picasso also needed the intellectual ability to think symbolically, like modern humans.

Scientists used a precise dating system based on the radioactive decay of uranium isotopes into thorium to assess the age of the paintings. This involved scraping a few milligrams of calcium carbonate deposit from the paintings for analysis.

A second related study published in Science Advances found that dyed and decorated marine shells from a different Spanish cave also dated back to pre-human times.

Taken together, the researchers said their work suggested that Neanderthals were “cognitively indistinguishable” from early modern humans.

Joao Zilhao of the University of Barcelona said the new findings meant the search for the origins of human cognition needed to go back to the common ancestor of both Neanderthals and modern humans more than 500,000 years ago.

Neanderthals died out about 40,000 years ago, soon after direct ancestors arrived in Europe. It is unclear what killed them off, although theories include an inability to adapt to climate change and increased competition from modern humans.

If they were still alive today, Pike believes they could well have gone on develop complex art and technology.

“If they had been given the time, the resources and the population, then they might have ended up in some version of the world we live in today.”

Source: Voice of America

Nigeria rescues 76 schoolgirls after Boko Haram attack, others missing

The Nigerian military rescued 76 schoolgirls and recovered the bodies of two others on Wednesday, after the students went missing during a Boko Haram attack on a village, three parents, a resident and a local government official told reporter.

“Everybody is celebrating their coming with songs and praises to God almighty,” said Babagana Umar, one of the parents whose daughter had disappeared. “The only sad news is that two girls were dead and no explanation.”

The rescued girls were returned to the village of Dapchi late on Wednesday evening, Umar and other residents said.

At least 13 students may still be missing, and reporter was unable to determine how the two girls died. Earlier on Wednesday, sources told reporter that 91 people were unaccounted for after a roll-call at their school on Tuesday.

Islamist insurgent group Boko Haram attacked Dapchi in the northeastern state of Yobe on Monday evening.

Police and state officials said on Wednesday that there was no evidence that the girls had been abducted, though the Yobe government later said in a statement that the military had rescued some of the students from Boko Haram.

Nigerian authorities often deny or downplay such incidents, including the Chibok girl kidnapping and more recent abductions, as well as the scale of Boko Haram attacks in the northeast.

Nigeria is still haunted by Boko Haram’s abduction of more than 270 schoolgirls from the town of Chibok in 2014. That case drew global attention to the nine-year insurgency, which has sparked what the United Nations has called one of the world’s worst humanitarian crises.

President Muhammadu Buhari dispatched his foreign and defense ministers on Wednesday to Yobe to investigate the situation, said Information Minister Lai Mohammed, who was also headed there. He declined to confirm whether any of the students were missing.

Parents and witnesses who told reporter of the missing students spoke on condition of anonymity because they said they had been warned by Nigerian security and government officials not to disclose the disappearance.

The Boko Haram militants arrived in Dapchi on Monday evening in trucks, some mounted with heavy guns and painted in military camouflage, witnesses told reporter.

They went directly to the school, shooting sporadically, sending students and teachers fleeing, the witnesses said, adding that some people had returned to Dapchi after spending the night hiding in the bush.

Yobe state Police Commissioner Sumonu Abdulmaliki told reporters on Tuesday that Boko Haram had also abducted three people from nearby Gaidam.

More than 20,000 people have been killed and two million forced to flee their homes in the northeast of Africa’s most populous nation since Boko Haram began its insurgency in 2009.

Of about 270 girls abducted from their school in Chibok in April 2014, about 60 escaped soon afterwards and others have since been released after mediation. Around 100 are still believed to be in captivity.

Last month, Boko Haram released a video purporting to show some of the Chibok girls still in its custody, saying they do not wish to return home.

Aid groups have said that Boko Haram has kidnapped thousands more adults and children, many of whose cases have been neglected.

Source: National News Agency