Daily Archives: November 24, 2017

Prepare African youth today to be leaders tomorrow: South Sudan official

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A 15-year-old boy, former child soldier, on his way to school in a South Sudan town. (file)
© UNICEF/UNI201161/Ohanesian

If Africa’s young people are not supported in becoming the leaders of tomorrow, they will be “detractors” of those in power today.

That’s the opinion of Robert Ladu Luki, Chairperson of the National Land Commission in South Sudan.

He was in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, recently for a UN-backed conference that looked at young people’s access to land.

Mr Ladu Luki spoke to Ernest Cho about his proposal to enshrine youth empowerment in national constitutions.

Duration: 2’24″

Russia sanctions fight; nuclear reckoning; extreme digital vetting, and more

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Our picksRussia sanctions fight; nuclear reckoning; extreme digital vetting, and more

Published 24 November 2017

• Exclusive: What Trump really told Kislyak after Comey was canned

• Congress braces for Russia sanctions face-off with White House as new deadline looms

• The ‘huge’ hole in the government’s Russian software ban

• A nuclear reckoning: Senators ponder the president’s power to launch Armageddon

• “We are not recommending you give to Texas per se”: GiveDirectly’s bold disaster-relief experiment

• Extreme digital vetting of visitors to the U.S. moves forward under a new name

Exclusive: What Trump really told Kislyak after Comey was canned (Howard Blum, Vanity Fair)
During a May 10 meeting in the Oval Office, the president betrayed his intelligence community by leaking the content of a classified, and highly sensitive, Israeli intelligence operation to two high-ranking Russian envoys, Sergey Kislyak and Sergey Lavrov. This is what he told them—and the ramifications.

Congress braces for Russia sanctions face-off with White House as new deadline looms (Andrew Desiderio, Daily Beast)
Lawmakers are furious that the White House has put enforcing sanctions against Russia on the backburner.

The ‘huge’ hole in the government’s Russian software ban (Eric Geller, Poliico)
DHS’ ban on Kapersky software doesn’t cover networks that contractors operate, even though employees may use them to discuss government work.

A nuclear reckoning: Senators ponder the president’s power to launch Armageddon (Alexandra Bell, War on the Rocks)
Congressional hearings happen all the time. If you inadvertently stumble across a C-SPAN channel, you will find any number of relatively unexciting discussions of public policy minutiae. These necessary, but often dull, proceedings end up like trees falling in a forest. If no one is watching, did they even happen?

We are not recommending you give to Texas per se”: GiveDirectly’s bold disaster-relief experiment (Dylan Matthews, Vox)
Why a charity focused on giving cash to East Africa started working near Houston.

Extreme digital vetting of visitors to the U.S. moves forward under a new name (George Joseph, ProPublica)
ICE officials have invited tech companies, including Microsoft, to develop algorithms that will track visa holders’ social media activity.

Pre-High-Level Revitalization consultations continue as Special Envoy Ambassador Ismail Wais meets IGAD partners in Juba

(November 24, 2017) As part of his broad-based consultative meetings ahead of the High-Level Revitalization Forum, the IGAD Special Envoy for South Sudan met IGAD partners in Juba on Friday November 24, 2017.

This is part of wider continuous engagements the Special Envoy has had with key South Sudanese stakeholders and the international community, critical for the successful convening of the Forum.

The Envoy briefed the partners of the regional effort in convening an inclusive Forum. He informed that so far, thirty-one consultative meetings were held with the various Parties, estranged groups and other key stakeholders.

The Parties to the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan (ARCSS) include all signatories (whether currently within or outside the Transitional Government of National Unity (TGoNU).

Keys consultations were held with H.E Salva Kiir Mayardit, President of the Republic of South Sudan, H.E General Taban Deng Gai, First Vice President, H.E Dr. James Wani Iga, Vice President as well as members of the Council of Ministers of the TGoNU.

Consultations were also held with the different opposition parties and armed groups. Other key stakeholders consulted included representatives of the Transitional National Legislative Assembly (TNLA), Steering Committee of the National Dialogue, Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission (JMEC), CTSAMM, UNMISS, South Sudan Chamber of Commerce and Faith Based Organisations.

Others consulted included eminent Personalities, Youth groups, Civil Society Organisations, Women Bloc and Women Associations, Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Protection of Civilian (PoC) sites, South Sudanese refugees and civil society in diaspora and the international community, partners and friends of South Sudan. In addition to consultations held in person South Sudanese stakeholders submitted aimed at achieving the objectives of the Forum made numerous submissions.

The Envoy noted the overwhelming support towards the Forum and expressed the high expectations by all stakeholders on the ARCSS revitalisation process.

“Many viewed the process as a timely opportunity to restore peace and implementation of the ARCSS,” he said.

“Many of the positions advanced and proposals submitted during the consultation process were very valuable. They must be considered at some stage whether before, during or after the Revitalisation Forum, if the cycle of violence is to be broken and for lasting peace to be restored in South Sudan.”

59th Extra-ordinary meeting the IGAD Council of Ministers has been called to convene on December 11 to 12, 2017. The convening of the Forum will follow the meeting of the IGAD Council of Ministers. The Council is expected to provide further guidelines on the modalities, structure and other details on how the Forum will be organised.

Mediterranean crossing still world’s deadliest for migrants – UN report

24 November 2017 &#150 Crossing the Mediterranean to Europe is “by far the world’s deadliest” journey for migrants, with at least 33,761 reported to have died or gone missing between 2000 and 2017, a United Nations report finds.

The report, released Friday from the International Organization for Migration (IOM), notes the highest number of fatalities, at 5,096, was recorded in 2016, when the short and relatively less dangerous route from Turkey to Greece was shut, following the European Union-Turkey deal.

“Shutting the shorter and less dangerous routes can open longer and more dangerous routes, thus increasing the likelihood of dying at sea,” said Professor Philippe Fargues of the European University Institute, who authored the report, Four Decades of Cross-Mediterranean Undocumented Migration to Europe.

The report reviews available evidence on trans-Mediterranean irregular migration to Europe along various routes going back to the 1970s, particularly on the magnitude of the flows, the evolution of sea routes to Southern Europe, the characteristics of migrants, the extent to which one can separate between economic and forced movements, and mortality during the sea journey.

More than 2.5 million migrants have crossed the Mediterranean in an unauthorized fashion since the 1970s.

Irregular sea journeys started rising in those years in response to the introduction, by Western States grappling with rising levels of unemployment during the 1973 oil crisis, of visa requirements for people who until then had been exempted – most of them temporary labour migrants from North Africa and Turkey.

These policies encouraged those who were already in Europe to stay, increased irregular migration of family members to join their relatives in Europe and gave way to the smuggling business, the report states.

The report also highlights differences between the modern pattern of migration from Africa to Italy, mostly via Libya, and that from the Middle East to Greece via Turkey.

Arrivals to Italy from North Africa largely originate across sub-Saharan Africa in response to deep migratory pressures – population growth coupled with limited livelihood opportunities, high unemployment and poor governance and political and economic instability.

Arrivals to Greece from Turkey since 2009 have been primarily of nationals from origin States affected by conflict and political instability, such as Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria.

Noting the limitations of available data on irregular migration, the report says the numbers of deaths at sea may grossly underestimate the real number of people who die or go missing while crossing the Mediterranean, as they are based on numbers of bodies found and survivors’ testimonies.

Inaction on climate change has “jeopardized human life”: Report

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Climate threatsInaction on climate change has “jeopardized human life”: Report

Published 24 November 2017

A major new report into climate change shows that the human symptoms of climate change are unequivocal and that the delayed response to climate change over the past twenty-five years has jeopardized human life and livelihoods.The human symptoms of climate change are unequivocal and potentially irreversible – affecting the health of populations around the world today.


mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;mso-bidi-language:HE”>A major new report into climate change shows that the human symptoms of climate change are unequivocal and that the delayed response to climate change over the past twenty-five years has jeopardized human life and livelihoods.


mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;mso-bidi-language:HE”>The 2017 annual report by the Lancet Countdown tracks the relations between climate change and public health.


mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;mso-bidi-language:HE”>The Lancet Countdown is an international research collaboration, providing a global overview of the relationship between public health and climate change. Publishing its findings in The Lancet medical journal each year, the initiative aims to help inform an accelerated response to climate change.


mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;mso-bidi-language:HE”>Leading academics and technical experts from across twenty-four partner institutions around the globe have contributed analysis included in the 2017 report. The University of
Sussex notes that p
“Times New Roman”;mso-bidi-language:HE”>artner organizations include the World Bank, World Health Organization, University College London, and the University of Sussex’s Sonja Ayeb-Karlsson and Dom Kniveton, based in the School of Global Studies.


mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;mso-bidi-language:HE”>“Our contribution with thematic working group 1 on Climate Change, Impacts, Exposure and Vulnerability mainly evolves around more comprehensive ways to measure and track disaster lethality,” says Sonja Ayeb-Karlsson. “We are in a way very fortunate to have spent plenty of time in the field, such as in Bangladesh and East and West Africa, talking to people who have faced environmental shocks through generations. This allows us to dig deeper to understand the processes and real-life stories beneath current health statistics.”


mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;mso-bidi-language:HE”>The 2017 report presents an assessment of the progress of the global response to climate change and associated health impacts across forty unique indicators from five thematic groups. The findings can be summarized in the following three key conclusions.

1.
HE”>The human symptoms of climate change are unequivocal and potentially irreversible – affecting the health of populations around the world, today.

2.
HE”>The delayed response to climate change over the past twenty-five years has jeopardized human life and livelihoods.

3.
HE”>Although progress has been historically slow, the past five years have seen an accelerated response, and in 2017 momentum is building across a number of sectors; the direction of travel is set, with clear and unprecedented opportunities for public health.

— Read more in The 2017 Report of the Lancet Countdown (The Lancet, October 2017)

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