Daily Archives: November 9, 2017

Draft agenda – Tuesday, 21 November 2017 – PE 612.358v02-00 – Committee on Fisheries

Committee on Fisheries

PECH(2017)1121_1

DRAFT AGENDA

Meeting

Tuesday 21 November 2017, 9.00 – 12.30 and 14.30 – 18.30

Brussels

Room: Altiero Spinelli (1G-2)

21 November 2017, 9.00 – 9.30

In camera

1.  Coordinators’ meeting

21 November 2017, 9.30 – 12.30

2.  Adoption of agenda

3.  Chair’s announcements

4.  Approval of minutes of meetings

·25 September 2017  PV – PE610.817v01-00

·9-10 October 2017  PV – PE612.077v01-00

With the Council and Commission

5.  Sustainable management of external fishing fleets

PECH/8/09198

***II  2015/0289(COD)  11382/2/2017 – C8-0358/2017

    T8-0015/2017

Rapporteur:

Linnéa Engström (Verts/ALE)

PR – PE607.934v01-00

Responsible:

PECH

·Consideration of draft recommendation for second reading

·Decision on deadline for tabling amendments

6.  Towards a sustainable and competitive European aquaculture sector: current status and future challenges

PECH/8/10355

  2017/2118(INI)  

Rapporteur:

Carlos Iturgaiz (PPE)

Responsible:

PECH

Opinions:

ENVI –

Francesc Gambús (PPE)

·Exchange of views

7.  Multiannual plan for small pelagic stocks in the Adriatic Sea and the fisheries exploiting those stocks

PECH/8/09349

***I  2017/0043(COD)  COM(2017)0097 – C8-0095/2017

Rapporteur:

Ruža Tomašić (ECR)

PR – PE602.914v01-00

Responsible:

PECH

Opinions:

ENVI

AM – PE607.775v02-00

·Consideration of draft report

8.  Optimisation of the value chain in the EU fishing sector

PECH/8/10357

  2017/2119(INI)  

Rapporteur:

Clara Eugenia Aguilera García (S&D)

DT – PE612.262v01-00

Responsible:

PECH

·Consideration of working document

9.  State of play of recreational fisheries in the European Union

PECH/8/10358

  2017/2120(INI)  

Rapporteur:

Norica Nicolai (ALDE)

Responsible:

PECH

·Exchange of views

——

21 November 2017, 14.30 – 18.30

With the Council and Commission

*** Electronic vote ***

10.  Sustainable management of external fishing fleets

PECH/8/09198

***II  2015/0289(COD)  11382/2/2017 – C8-0358/2017

    T8-0015/2017

Rapporteur:

Linnéa Engström (Verts/ALE)

PR – PE607.934v01-00
AG – PE607.818v01-00
LA – PE609.282v01-00

Responsible:

PECH

·Adoption of draft recommendation for second reading

11.  Conservation of fishery resources and the protection of marine ecosystems through technical measures

PECH/8/06008

***I  2016/0074(COD)  COM(2016)0134 – C8-0117/2016

·Adoption of draft report

·Vote on the decision to enter into interinstitutional negotiations

12.  Management, conservation and control measures applicable in the Convention Area of the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organisation (SPRFMO)

PECH/8/09619

***I  2017/0056(COD)  COM(2017)0128 – C8-0121/2017

·Adoption of draft report

·Vote on the decision to enter into interinstitutional negotiations

13.  The next MFF: Preparing the Parliament’s position on the MFF post-2020

PECH/8/09711

  2017/2052(INI)  

Rapporteur for the opinion:

Clara Eugenia Aguilera García (S&D)

PA – PE610.677v02-00
AM – PE612.247v01-00

Responsible:

BUDG –

Jan Olbrycht (PPE)
Isabelle Thomas (S&D)

·Adoption of draft opinion

*** End of electronic vote ***

14.  Protocol setting out the fishing opportunities and the financial contribution provided for by the Fisheries Partnership Agreement between the European Union and the Republic of Mauritius

PECH/8/11046

***  2017/0223(NLE)  COM(2017)0486

Rapporteur:

Norica Nicolai (ALDE)

Responsible:

PECH

Opinions:

BUDG –

Inese Vaidere (PPE)

·Exchange of views with Commission representatives

15.  Lagging regions in the EU

PECH/8/11138

  2017/2208(INI)  

·Consideration of draft opinion

·Decision on deadline for tabling amendments

16.  Report on the Committee on Fisheries’ delegation to Guadeloupe from 29 October to 2 November 2017

17.  Any other business

18.  Chair’s announcements concerning coordinators’ decisions

19.  Next meetings

·28 November 2017, 9.00 – 12.30 and 14.30 – 18.30 (Brussels)

* * *

Bonn: At UN climate conference, Congo Basin youth spotlight their work protecting fragile forest ecosystem

9 November 2017 &#150 Youth groups working in Africa’s Congo Basin countries are supporting economic progress in isolated rural communities while protecting the forest, and a young woman at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP 23) in Bonn, Germany, said it is time their voices were heard.

Youth groups working in Africa’s Congo Basin countries are supporting economic progress in isolated rural communities while protecting the forest, and a young woman at the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23) in Bonn, Germany, said it that is time their voices were heard.

“Young people in the Congo Basin have been doing things on the ground that often go ignored,” explained Marie Tamoifo, President of the Cameroon Green Youth Association (Association de la Jeunesse verte du Cameroun – AJVC) and Regional Coordinator of the Youth Network for sustainable management of forest ecosystems in Central Africa (Réseau des jeunes pour la gestion durable des écosystèmes forestiers d’Afrique centrale – REJEFAC) in an interview with UN News.

REJEFAC brings together youth organizations from 10 Congo Basin countries – Burundi, Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe and Chad).

Its aim is to promote the effective participation of young environmental actors in decision-making in the Congo Basin and “to contribute to the emergence in the region of a new type of leadership, more sensitive and open to the requirements of sustainable development.”

“[As for] actions on the ground, there are reforestation, awareness and education programmes for young people. It’s about strengthening the work that is done by governments,” said Ms. Tamoifo.

A solar panel programme in isolated communities

For several years, AJVC has been developing a programme in Cameroon for the electrification of isolated rural areas with solar panels. The programme started in 15 pilot communities in the east, in the center and in the far north of the country with the installation of solar panels in homes and schools. A contribution is made by the community itself, representing 25 to 30 per cent of the cost.

“In these 15 communities, we trained 85 young people in solar installation techniques but also in psycho-socio-organizational methodology,” explained Ms Tamoifo. “When we arrive in a community, we first hold a discussion with that community. We try to see with [them] what the glaring problems are.”

The youth participating in this programme are from the community. They are trained and they provide maintenance for the solar panels that have already been installed. “For now, they are not really paid. They receive a small allowance,” added Ms.Tamoifo.

The association needs more financial support to maintain and expand this programme. “We have received more than 100 requests from villages and we cannot answer them given [our] modest means. And young people who are trained today also need to make a living to be able to continue this work,” she said.

A ‘climate caravan’ in Cameroon

Among other actions carried out by young people in the Congo Basin region, the REJEFAC Coordinator mentioned a tree planting initiative by volunteers in the Republic of Congo, and a programme focusing on handicrafts and conservation of natural resources in Rwanda.

Before coming to COP 23, the network organized a ‘climate caravan’ in Cameroon with the participation of young people from the ten countries of the Congo Basin to show what youth organizations are doing in terms of sustainable development and protection of the planet.

“We organized this caravan which was named ‘the COP at home,’” said the Coordinator of REJEFAC. Young people have been designated as climate ambassadors.

The ‘climate caravan’ travelled in the Douala region, coastal areas and went to Equatorial Guinea. “It showed how we could talk about the theoretical aspect and go on the ground to experience the realities of conservation parks and conflicts between humans and elephants,” concluded Ms. Tamoifo.

U.S. had 3rd warmest and 2nd wettest year to date

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Climate-change threatsU.S. had 3rd warmest and 2nd wettest year to date

Published 9 November 2017

October typically ushers in those crisp, sunny days of fall. But last month was no ordinary October, as warm and wet conditions dampened peak leaf viewing across many parts of the Midwest and New England and fires devastated parts of Northern California and the West.

October typically ushers in those crisp, sunny days of fall. But last month was no ordinary October, as warm and wet conditions dampened peak leaf viewing across many parts of the Midwest and New England and fires devastated parts of Northern California and the West.

Climate by the numbers
October 2017

NOAAsays that October’s nationally averaged temperature was 55.7 degrees F, 1.6 degrees above average, which placed it among the warmest third of the historical record. Record warmth spanned New England with much-above-average temperatures stretching into the Great Lakes and Mid-Atlantic. Below-average temperatures were observed in the Northwest and Northern Rockies. The precipitation total for the month was 2.53 inches, 0.37 of an inch above average.

The year to date
The year to date (January–October 2017) average temperature for the contiguous U.S. was the third warmest on record at 57.5 degrees F, 2.5 degrees above average. Every state across the contiguous U.S. had an above-average temperature for the first 10 months of the year. The year-to-date precipitation was the second wettest on record for this period at 28.93 inches, 3.57 inches above average.

More notable climate events include:

· Hurricane Nate made double Gulf Coast landfall: On October 7, Nate made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River in Louisiana and a second landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi, as a Category 1 hurricane. Nate brought heavy rains to the central Gulf Coast and Southern Appalachians.

· Tropical Storm Philippe saturated Florida and the East Coast: On October 29, Philippe made landfall near the Everglades National Park in Florida with sustained winds of 45 mph. The remnants of Philippe interacted with a storm off the East Coast and brought heavy rain, hurricane-force winds and battering waves to the Northeast.

· Northern California endured catastrophic wildfires: A hot and windy weather pattern during the second week of October caused several wildfires to grow out of control very quickly in N. California. More than 40 people died, and thousands of homes and business were destroyed — it was the deadliest week in California wildfire history, according to state officials.

· Drought eased in the North and expanded in the South: Drought spread in parts of the South while beneficial rains helped alleviate drought in northern areas of the U.S . As of October 31, the contiguous U.S. drought footprint (total area) was 12 percent, down 2.4 percent from  the start of the month.

— See more about NOAA’s report and download related maps and images at the NCEI Website

There are Several Ways to Vote in Federal By-elections

There are Several Ways to Vote in Federal By-elections

Gatineau, Thursday, November 9, 2017

For the by-elections now underway in Battlefords–Lloydminster (Saskatchewan), Bonavista–Burin–Trinity (Newfoundland and Labrador), Scarborough–Agincourt (Ontario) and South Surrey–White Rock (British Columbia), electors can choose the voting option that best suits their schedule. They can vote:

  • on election day, on Monday, December 11.
  • at advance polls on Friday, December 1; Saturday, December 2; Sunday, December 3; or Monday, December 4.
  • in person at an Elections Canada office, if they apply before 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 5.
  • by mail. Electors must apply to vote by mail before 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 5.
    • Application forms are available online, as well as at any Elections Canada office or Canadian mission abroad. They can also be requested by calling 1‑800‑463‑6868.
    • Electors can mail in a paper application or submit their application online.
    • Electors voting by mail should plan ahead. They must allow time for their voting kit to reach them and for their marked ballot to return to Elections Canada.
    • Marked ballots must be received by the election day deadline, or they will not be counted. Visit elections.ca for more details.
  • To vote, electors must show proof of identity and address. The list of accepted pieces of identification is online.
  • Some pieces of identification used at provincial, territorial and municipal elections may not meet federal election requirements.
  • Voting and identification rules are different for Canadian Forces electors, incarcerated electors and Canadian electors who live abroad.

Ready to vote.

Elections Canada is an independent body set up by Parliament.

Information:
Elections Canada Media Relations
1-877-877-9515
elections.ca

Latest from the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine (SMM), based on information received as of 19:30, 8 November 2017

This report is for the media and the general public.

The SMM recorded fewer ceasefire violations in Donetsk region and more in Luhansk region compared with the previous reporting period. In Pikuzy, a man in military-style clothing fired shots in the air within 50m of the Mission. The SMM continued monitoring the disengagement areas; it recorded ceasefire violations in the Petrivske disengagement area and near the Stanytsia Luhanska disengagement area. Its access remained restricted in the disengagement areas and elsewhere, including near Kreminets and at two heavy weapons holding areas.* The Mission saw weapons in violation of withdrawal lines near Sievierodonetsk. It facilitated and monitored repairs and maintenance of essential infrastructure near Shchastia, Novozvanivka, Artema, and Stanytsia Luhanska. The SMM visited a border area not under government control. It continued to monitor a gathering outside the Parliament in Kyiv.

In Donetsk region the SMM recorded fewer ceasefire violations,[1] including, however, more explosions (about 150), compared with the previous reporting period (about 120 explosions).

On the evening of 7 November, the SMM camera at the Donetsk Filtration Station (15km north of Donetsk) recorded a projectile in flight from west to east 0.5-1.5km south. On the morning of 8 November, the camera recorded, in sequence, three tracer rounds in flight from west to east and an undetermined explosion, all 0.5-1.5km south. In the afternoon, the camera recorded, in sequence, six projectiles in flight from east to west, 23 explosions assessed as impacts, and a projectile from north-west to south-east, followed by totals of 13 explosions assessed as impacts, three undetermined explosions, 11 projectiles (eight from east to west, two from west to east, one from north-west to south-east), and two tracer rounds from north-west to south-east, all 0.5-1.5km south.

On 8 November, positioned on the south-western edge of government-controlled Avdiivka (17km north of Donetsk) for about five hours, the SMM heard five explosions assessed as outgoing rounds 1-2km east and five explosions assessed as the subsequent impacts 6-7km east; the Mission also heard about 70 undetermined explosions, over 60 bursts of heavy-machine-gun fire, and over 80 shots of small-arms fire, all 2-6km at directions ranging from east to south. In the afternoon, the SMM camera in Avdiivka recorded, in sequence, an explosion assessed as an impact, three projectiles in flight from south-west to north-east, 13 tracer rounds in flight from south-west to north-east, five undetermined explosions, an explosion assessed as an outgoing projectile (which then flew from north-west to south-east), two projectiles from east to west, an undetermined explosion, and a projectile from east to west, all 4-6km east-south-east.

Positioned for four and a half hours at the “DPR”-controlled Donetsk central railway station (6km north-west of Donetsk city centre), the SMM heard 13 undetermined explosions 5-8km north-north-east.

On the evening of 7 November, while in government-controlled Svitlodarsk (57km north-east of Donetsk), the SMM heard three explosions assessed as outgoing rounds of infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) (BMP-1) cannon (73mm) fire 5-6km south-east; the Mission also heard two undetermined explosions and over 50 bursts and shots of small-arms fire, all 4-6km south-east and south-west. During the day on 8 November, while in the same location, the SMM heard two undetermined explosions, 30 bursts of heavy-machine-gun fire, and three bursts of small-arms fire, all 4-7km south-west and west; the Mission also heard five undetermined explosions and about 30 bursts of heavy-machine-gun fire, all 3-5km at directions ranging from north-east to south-east.

On the evening of 7 November the SMM camera in Shyrokyne (20km east of Mariupol) recorded, in sequence, an undetermined explosion, 32 projectiles in flight from east to west, a projectile from west to east, four projectiles from east to west, a projectile from south-east to north-west, seven projectiles from west to east, a projectile from east to west, three projectiles from west to east, 15 projectiles from east to west, two projectiles from south to north, an illumination flare in vertical flight, and two projectiles from west to east, all 5-8km north. On the afternoon of 8 November the camera recorded, in sequence, a projectile from west to east and an undetermined explosion, both 5-8km north.

At 11:30 on 8 November, positioned in front of a store in the centre of “DPR”-controlled Pikuzy (formerly Kominternove, 23km north-east of Mariupol), the SMM saw a man in military-style clothing 30-50m to the east fire three shots from an assault rifle (AK-47) into the air. Three minutes later, the Mission saw the man walk across the street and behind a house. The SMM then heard five shots of small-arms fire at least 50m to the north-east, from the direction of where the man had disappeared from view. Immediately afterward, a light-brown Lada car with “DPR” plates arrived and stopped nearby, and an unarmed man in military-style clothing emerged and went into the store. Another man in military-style clothing drove the car in the direction from where the sound of the five shots had come and began shouting something that the SMM could not understand. Five minutes later, the SMM departed. No injury to Mission members or assets occurred.

In Luhansk region the SMM recorded more ceasefire violations, including about 75 explosions, compared with the previous reporting period (nine explosions).

Positioned in “LPR”-controlled Kalynove (60km west of Luhansk), the SMM heard 22 undetermined explosions 15-20km south-west.

Positioned 3km south-east of government-controlled Muratove (51km north-west of Luhansk), the SMM heard 50 undetermined explosions and 20 bursts of heavy-machine-gun fire, all 3-7km east-south-east.

The SMM continued to monitor the disengagement process and to pursue full access to the disengagement areas near Stanytsia Luhanska (16km north-east of Luhansk), Zolote (60km west of Luhansk) and Petrivske (41km south of Donetsk), as foreseen in the Framework Decision of the Trilateral Contact Group relating to disengagement of forces and hardware of 21 September 2016. The SMM’s access remained restricted but the Mission was able to partially monitor them.*

In the early morning of 6 November, the SMM camera in “DPR”-controlled Petrivske recorded, in sequence, 13 tracer rounds in flight from west to east, 28 tracer rounds from north-west to south-east, 15 tracer rounds from west to east, one tracer round from east to west, four tracer rounds from west to east, and four tracer rounds from south-west to north-east, all 1-3km south and south-west. Fourteen of the rounds from north-west to south-east and the four rounds from south-west to north-east were assessed as inside the disengagement area, while the Mission was unable to assess whether the rest were inside or outside the disengagement area.

On 8 November, positioned at the southern end of the Stanytsia Luhanska bridge, the SMM heard an undetermined explosion and, nine minutes later, saw ten flares in vertical flight, all 3km south-east (assessed as outside disengagement area).

Near the southern edge of the disengagement area south of government-controlled Zolote, the SMM noted that 14 anti-tank mines previously observed about 100m north of the “LPR” checkpoint, inside the disengagement area, were no longer present. (See SMM Daily Report 20 October 2017.)

The SMM continued to monitor the withdrawal of weapons, in implementation of the Package of Measures and its Addendum, as well as the Memorandum.

In violation of the respective withdrawal lines in government-controlled areas, the SMM saw 12 anti-tank guns (MT-12 Rapira, 100mm) near Sievierodonetsk (74km north-west of Luhansk).

Beyond the respective withdrawal lines but outside designated storage sites, the SMM saw, in government-controlled areas, a surface-to-air missile system (9K33 Osa) travelling east near Novoandriivka (52km south-west of Donetsk).

In non-government-controlled areas, the SMM saw six tanks (type unknown) in firing positions south-east of Ternove (57km east of Donetsk), in an area where the SMM had previously observed live-fire exercises. Later in the day, the SMM saw that four tanks were present at the same location.

The SMM observed weapons that could not be verified as withdrawn, as their storage did not comply with the criteria set out in the 16 October 2015 notification from the SMM to the signatories of the Package of Measures on effective monitoring and verification of the withdrawal of heavy weapons. In government-controlled areas beyond the respective withdrawal lines, the SMM saw nine towed howitzers (2A65 Msta-B, 152mm) – including one for the first time – one anti-tank gun (MT-12), and, for the first time, nine self-propelled howitzers (2S1 Gvozdika, 122mm). The Mission observed as missing: 41 anti-tank guns (38 MT-12, including five for the first time; and three D-48, 85mm); 37 towed howitzers (23 2A65, including three for the first time; six D-30 Lyagushka, 122mm; and eight 2A36 Giatsint-B, 152mm, including seven for the first time); and 28 mortars (12 M-120 Molot, 120mm; 15 2B11 Sani, 120mm; and one BM-37, 82mm). The SMM also observed that one site was abandoned, with seven towed howitzers (2A36) missing, including five for the first time.

The SMM revisited a heavy weapons permanent storage site in a non-government-controlled area and noted that seven towed howitzers (D-30) were still missing.

The SMM observed armoured combat vehicles (ACVs)[2], a military-type armoured vehicle, and tracks of ACVs in the security zone. In non-government-controlled areas the SMM saw two stationary IFVs (BMP-1) and a stationary military-type armoured vehicle near Nova Marivka (64km south of Donetsk), as well as fresh tracks assessed as those of two or three IFVs (BMP-variant) heading south from near Nova Tavriia (25km north-east of Mariupol).

The SMM observed mines and mine hazard signs. On 6 November, the SMM saw, for the first time, a row of 10-12 anti-tank mines (TM-62P3) in a field north of a road 3km south of government-controlled Lomakyne (15km north-east of Mariupol); the row was oriented perpendicular to the road, with the nearest mine about 5m from the road.

At the eastern entrance to Nova Marivka, the SMM saw again a metal gate with a red sign (with “Danger, Mines” in English and Russian) blocking the road. (See SMM Daily Report 17 July 2017.) A person in military-type clothing present told the Mission that no mines were present, and that “DPR” members had set up the roadblock and sign to prevent civilians from travelling through the village. In Nova Marivka, an armed person told the Mission that unexploded ordnance (UXO) near a checkpoint 2.5km east of Staromarivka (62km south of Donetsk), previously observed by the Mission (see SMM Daily Report 19 August 2017), was inert, and that “DPR” members had placed it there to prevent civilian traffic along the road.

The SMM continued to facilitate and monitor repairs and maintenance work, co-ordinated by the Joint Centre for Control and Co-ordination (JCCC), to the power plant in government-controlled Shchastia (20km north of Luhansk), high-voltage lines between government-controlled Troitske (69km west of Luhansk) and Novozvanivka (70km west of Luhansk), the Petrivske water pumping station near government-controlled Artema (26km north of Luhansk), and water wells near Stanytsia Luhanska.

The SMM visited a border area not under government control.* During one hour and 40 minutes at a border crossing point near Marynivka (78km east of Donetsk), the SMM saw 28 cars (17 with Ukrainian and six with Russian Federation licence plates, and five with “DPR” plates) and three trucks with covered cargo areas (with Ukrainian licence plates) exiting Ukraine and 19 cars (seven with Ukrainian and seven with Russian Federation licence plates, and five with “DPR” plates) entering Ukraine.

In Kyiv, the SMM continued to monitor the gathering in front of the national Parliament building. (See SMM Daily Report 8 November 2017.) The SMM saw about 100 protestors (about 80 per cent men, aged 25-70 years old) and about 20 police officers. The SMM did not observe any security incidents while present.

The SMM continued monitoring in Kherson, Odessa, Lviv, Ivano-Frankivsk, Kharkiv, Dnipro, and Chernivtsi.

*Restrictions of SMM’s freedom of movement or other impediments to fulfilment of its mandate

The SMM’s monitoring and freedom of movement are restricted by security hazards and threats, including risks posed by mines, UXO and other impediments – which vary from day to day. The SMM’s mandate provides for safe and secure access throughout Ukraine. All signatories of the Package of Measures have agreed on the need for this safe and secure access, that restriction of the SMM’s freedom of movement constitutes a violation, and on the need for rapid response to these violations. They have also agreed that the JCCC should contribute to such response and co-ordinate mine clearance. Nonetheless, the armed formations in parts of Donetsk and Luhansk regions frequently deny the SMM access to areas adjacent to Ukraine’s border outside control of the Government, citing orders to do so. (See, for example, SMM Daily Report 23 October 2017.) The SMM’s operations in Donetsk and Luhansk regions remained restricted following the fatal incident of 23 April near Pryshyb; these restrictions continued to limit the Mission’s observations.

Denial of access:

Related to disengagement areas and mines/UXO:

  • The SMM was prevented from accessing secondary roads south of the Zolote disengagement area due to the possible presence of mines and UXO. An unarmed “LPR” member positioned on the southern side of the Zolote disengagement area told the SMM that no demining had taken place during the previous 24 hours. The SMM did not consider it safe to proceed and informed the JCCC.
  • The SMM was prevented from accessing secondary roads in the Zolote disengagement area due to the possible presence of mines and UXO. A Ukrainian Armed Forces officer of the JCCC at a checkpoint on the northern side of the Zolote disengagement area told the SMM that no demining had taken place during the previous 24 hours. The SMM did not consider it safe to proceed and informed the JCCC.
  • The SMM was prevented from accessing parts of the Stanytsia Luhanska disengagement area, with the exception of the main road, due to the possible presence of mines and UXO. A Ukrainian Armed Forces officer of the JCCC told the SMM that no de-mining had taken place during the previous 24 hours. The SMM did not consider it safe to proceed and informed the JCCC.
  • The SMM could not travel south from the southern end of the bridge in Shchastia due to the presence of mines. A Ukrainian Armed Forces officer of the JCCC said there were mines on the road south of the bridge. The SMM informed the JCCC. (The SMM also saw again three rows of 12 anti-tank mines (TM-62M) each, about 100m south of the Ukrainian Armed Forces position south of the bridge.)

Conditional access:

  • A person in military-style clothing at a checkpoint on road H15 east of “DPR”-controlled Kreminets (16km south-west of Donetsk) did not allow the SMM to pass until the person had visually inspected two of the Mission’s trailers from the outside. The SMM informed the JCCC.

Delay:

  • A Ukrainian Armed Forces soldier delayed the SMM’s access to a heavy weapons holding area for 18 minutes. The SMM informed the JCCC.
  • A Ukrainian Armed Forces soldier delayed the SMM’s access to another heavy weapons holding area for 17 minutes. The SMM informed the JCCC.

Other impediments:

  • At the central city hospital in “DPR”-controlled Debaltseve (58km north-east of Donetsk), medical staff told the SMM that information could not be released without permission from a “DPR” member. Later in the day, the staff told the Mission that information on hospitals could be provided only by “DPR” members in Donetsk city.

[1]Please see the annexed report for a complete breakdown of the ceasefire violations as well as a map of the Donetsk and Luhansk regions marked with locations featured in this report. During this reporting period the SMM camera at the Oktiabr mine (Donetsk) remained non-operational. Nine SMM cameras are in a testing phase, to last until 30 November 2017.

[2] This hardware is not proscribed by the provisions of the Minsk agreements on the withdrawal of weapons.