Daily Archives: August 7, 2017

Africa: Cote d'Ivoire's National Day

On behalf of the Government of the United States, congratulations to the people of Côte d’Ivoire, as you celebrate your national independence on August 7th.

The United States and Côte d’Ivoire have maintained close and friendly relations since your nation’s inception. On this 57th anniversary of Côte d’Ivoire’s independence, the United States reaffirms its commitment to helping your nation work towards the goals of lasting peace and economic prosperity. Côte d’Ivoire’s dedication to democracy will strengthen its future growth and stability.

We wish the people of Côte d’Ivoire continued progress and success, as you commemorate your National Day.

Africa: Cote d'Ivoire's National Day

On behalf of the Government of the United States, congratulations to the people of Côte d’Ivoire, as you celebrate your national independence on August 7th.

The United States and Côte d’Ivoire have maintained close and friendly relations since your nation’s inception. On this 57th anniversary of Côte d’Ivoire’s independence, the United States reaffirms its commitment to helping your nation work towards the goals of lasting peace and economic prosperity. Côte d’Ivoire’s dedication to democracy will strengthen its future growth and stability.

We wish the people of Côte d’Ivoire continued progress and success, as you commemorate your National Day.

Africa: Cote d’Ivoire’s National Day


Press Statement

Rex W. Tillerson

Secretary of State

Washington, DC

August 7, 2017


On behalf of the Government of the United States, congratulations to the people of Côte d’Ivoire, as you celebrate your national independence on August 7th.

The United States and Côte d’Ivoire have maintained close and friendly relations since your nation’s inception. On this 57th anniversary of Côte d’Ivoire’s independence, the United States reaffirms its commitment to helping your nation work towards the goals of lasting peace and economic prosperity. Côte d’Ivoire’s dedication to democracy will strengthen its future growth and stability.

We wish the people of Côte d’Ivoire continued progress and success, as you commemorate your National Day.



Long-Term Potential of Nuclear Power Remains High: IAEA Report

Nuclear power’s long-term potential remains high, although its global expansion is projected to slow down in coming years, according to a new IAEA report on International Status and Prospects for Nuclear Power 2017.

The decline compared to previous projections is mainly on account of early retirement or lack of interest in extending life of nuclear power plants in some countries, due to the reduced competitiveness of nuclear power in the short run and national nuclear policies in several countries following the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011.

The report analyses the factors which could influence the future of nuclear power, such as funding and financing, electricity markets and public acceptance. If nuclear power’s potential as a low-carbon energy source grows in recognition and advanced reactor designs further improve both safety and radioactive waste management, the use of nuclear power could grow significantly, the report says.

“In some countries, concerns about climate change provide an incentive to support continued operation of nuclear power plants, or are part of the argument for a new build programme,” said Mikhail Chudakov, Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Energy. 

“Over time advanced technologies may become commercially available for consideration as part of a low carbon energy mix. More than 30 advanced water cooled reactors are already under construction worldwide. In the meantime, and in light of increased demand for clean energy, maintaining an operating fleet is necessary in order to bridge the gap between existing and next-generation technologies.”

The IAEA’s projections for global installed nuclear power capacity in the high case indicate an increase from 2016 levels by 42% in 2030, by 83% in 2040 and by 123% in 2050. The low case projects a decline in capacity by 12% in 2030 and 15% in 2040 before rebounding to present levels by 2050. 

Significant decline is expected in North America and in the region including northern, western and southern Europe, with only slight increases in Africa and western Asia. Significant growth is projected in central and eastern Asia, where nuclear power capacity is expected to undergo an increase of 43% by 2050. 

The low projections through to 2050 show no net growth in installed capacity; however, that does not mean there is no new construction. In fact, even in the low case, some 320 GW(e) of new nuclear power capacity will be installed by 2050, making up for the loss caused by retiring reactors, albeit not necessarily in the same regions. 

Global electricity demand growth continues and is mainly driven by emerging economies. There are 28 countries interested in introducing nuclear power. Of the 30 countries already operating nuclear power plants, 13 are either constructing new ones or are actively completing previously suspended construction projects, and 16 have plans or proposals for building new reactors.

The IAEA’s projections are developed by world experts taking into account the status and condition of all 447 operating reactors, possible licence renewals, planned shutdowns and plausible construction projects foreseen for the next several decades. The low case, designed to produce “conservative but plausible” estimates, assumes a continuation of current market, technology and resource trends with few changes to policies affecting nuclear power. The high case assumes that current rates of economic and electricity demand growth, particularly in Asia, will continue. 

The detailed account is published annually in the IAEA’s publication Energy, Electricity and Nuclear Power Estimates for the Period up to 2050. Its 37th edition will be published in September 2017. 
 

“Nothing can justify terrible acts of abuse” in Kasai region: UNICEF

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In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, a nurse from the Kabea Kamwanga hospital is treating a malnourished and malaria-infected child with medicines donated by UNICEF, on May 20th 2017. Photo/UNICEF/UN064905

“Nothing can justify” the terrible acts of abuse against women and children in the Kasai region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) in recent months.

That’s the view of Marie-Pierre Poirier, the Regional Director for the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) in West and Central Africa, in a statement issued on Monday.

The Kasais have been convulsed by violence between armed groups and government forces which has caused 1.4 million to flee their homes in the past year.

Matt Wells has more.

The majority of the civilians who have become refugees or internally displaced due to brutal conflict in the Kasais—around 850,000—are children.

Ms Poirier said that their lives had simply been “turned upside down by widespread acts of extreme violence.”

She said that apart from “terrible acts of abuse” many children had been drugged and forcibly recruited by armed groups.

The UNICEF official added that an estimated 400,000 children are at risk of severe acute malnutrition and more than 200 health centres have been destroyed in the Kasais; a large western region of DRC.

She warned that unless the violence stopped, UNICEF’s best efforts to protect thousands of children would be in vain.

All parties to the fighting must protect children, she said, and humanitarians needed “unhindered” access to affected populations in order to reach all those in need of assistance.

Matt Wells, United Nations.

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